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Fall 2019
Nov 30,2020
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SOCI 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: SOCIOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Sociology Department

SOCI 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. It does so through the writings and theories of classical and contemporary thinkers in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the works of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, the founders of the sociological perspective. Textbooks, class lectures, films, and other materials will help students to apply a sociological analysis to present day society and to their personal lives.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: SOCIOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Sociology Department

SOCI 202 - SOCIAL INEQUALITY
An examination of social inequality, how it is constituted and maintained and what forces exist for change; how race/ethnicity, gender and class interact to produce the kinds of cleavages that currently prevail. In order to better understand inequality in a global context, we will examine varous regions and the dynamics of inequality therein. Students will thereby hone their analytical and critical thinking skills.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

SOCI 203 - SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
In exploring the cultural meanings people have produced via sports, this course devotes particular attention to symbolic social and political meanings pertaining to social control, nationalism, and patriotism. ln addressing these symbolic meanings, the course probes whether these symbolic meanings prop up social hierarchies and exacerbate inequality, or challenge these hierarchies and mitigate inequality. The course’s review of sports and social norms considers both the role that sports play in creating and sustaining certain social norms, such as norms pertaining to competition, cooperation, and violence, and how sports generates deviance, crime, and corruption. The course’s examination of the structural and institutional dimensions of sports focuses on the relationship between sports and social ratification, particularly with respect to race, social class, and sex/gender. The course delves into the specific social and economic-based forces and mechanisms that contribute to stratification, and attempts to address whether sports should be viewed as an engine of opportunity and social mobility, or a system of exploitation and a replicator of inequality. Lastly, Sociology of Sport addresses the role that sports have played in promoting social change. The course inquires into how some people and organizations have used sports as a platform to challenge inequality and social hierarchies, and how other people and organizations have resisted such efforts to change the status quo.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Culture & Creativity

SOCI 205 - SOCIOLOGY OF AGING
An examination of aging as a social process and what it means to grow old in this society. The course connects the structure of society to the demographic characteristics of the aging population and American values and attitudes to public and private behavior toward the old. Special attention will be given to the experience of aging by social category (gender, ethnicity, and race) in terms of the physical, social, psychological, and economic health of the elderly and the stresses which surface in social relationships.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 206 - ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
This course examines the history of environmental sociology, with particular respect to the theoretical frameworks that sociologists have developed to understand the relationships between human social patterns and the environment. Broad substantive themes include systematic causes of environmental disruption, social consequences of environmental disruption, and some social responses to environmental disruption. The course features analysis of environmental issues as they intersect with labor, business, health, law, media, food, and development.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Syst, Sust&Society

SOCI 210 - GLOBAL WORKPLACE
An examination of the changing nature of work in modern society, including the dilemmas of white collar employment and the rise of part-time, unprotected labor and the "informal" sector. Domestic conditions will be related to the internationalization of production and distribution via transnational corporations who contract branded products via maqila assembly plants that hire young women. The course will also discuss the search for meaningful work, and the battle over international labor standards and trade. Students will review their own work histories and recommend improved forms of work organization.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

SOCI 215 - SOCIOLOGY OF RACE RELATIONS
This course studies inter-group relations. We will look at the increasing diversity of U.S. society which has resulted from major historical and contemporary processes (i.e., colonization, slavery, and immigration). The question of who has fared better in the U.S., and why some groups are more successful than others, have been central concerns in the sociology of race relations. Does social class of origin among immigrants help or hinder their adjustment to a new society? Does religion make a difference today? Is color important? Many think it matters the most. Finally, the course will examine how we, as a society, have historically constructed "the other", to justify economic and other kinds of exploitation. Our theoretical framework will include the study of structural and attitudinal factors which contribute to discrimination, prejudice, and general intolerance.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science, MJ-Amer-Race & Ethnicity, MJ-AMER-Multicultural Studies, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

SOCI 221 - SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
This course is an introduction to the role of social movements in the contemporary world. It will begin with an assessment of sociological theory on social movements and address the old forms of collective action from which this literature springs. Then, the course will interpret the emergence of the "new social movements" of feminism, peace and ecology, and how they image the overcoming of the current ecological and socio-economic crisis. Special attention will be given to the claim that all these actions are part of a global movement for a new economic order.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 225 - SOCIAL PROBLEMS
A critical examination of social problems that have resulted from social changes and social controls in contemporary America. The thoughts of leading sociologists on these problems will be examined. Each student will select a social problem and explore it from a theoretical perspective and from available research. Lab Fee.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
SS-Sch Core-Consc & Society

SOCI 230 - SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH & MEDICINE
Many elements can be said to constitute a legitimate analysis of health, illness and medicine; among these are definitions of health and sickness, the impact of macro structures such as the economy and the structure of the health professions as well as the role of civil society and public health initiatives. The focus of the course is on diverse topics such as professionalization, inequality in access, social policy and technology. We will discuss how illnesses arise, models of health and wellness and the role of public policy in a comparative perspective. Health and healthcare policy has been the subject of much debate in the United States. There is an interactive relationship between the ways in which health and illness are understood and treated in society. Although the western or allopathic model of health and illness is generally hegemonic, other paradigms do inform modes of health care practice such as homeopathy and folk medicine. We will examine these modalities as well. This course will fulfill the Topics: Social Science Category of the General Education Program. It examines definitions of health and medicine as well as the development of the health care professions in historical context. Students will examine the social forces that impact conceptions of health and illness and the delivery of healthcare in the United States and in other countries.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Syst, Sust&Society, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

SOCI 232 - SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY
A sociological examination of the family and marriage in the United States, both as a social institution and as a set of intimate relationships in the context of historical change and development in the West. The course will explore the changing roles of women, men, and children within the family as they are affected by economic and social forces. Special attention will be given to the function of the contemporary family within the larger social structure.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 235 - COMPARATIVE DEVELOPMENT
Third world societies in Africa, Asia, and Latin America offer tremendous potential for development, but the pressure is toward uncontrolled "modernization" and indebtedness rather than balanced self-determination. Either repression or revolution can result. This course critically examines the theories and models that affect various forms of development, including dependency theory, Marxist conceptions of imperialism, world-system theory and economic sustainable programs.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, SS-Sch Core-Sustainability

SOCI 240 - THE BLACK FAMILY
The Black family, like all families, faces a crisis as we approach the 21st century. Not only are we faced with a growing number of unemployed family members, but we are also witnessing an ever increasing number of single never-married households. Less than half of all Black children are raised in two-parent families. Many of these children are poor because their mothers are poor. Middle class Black families are confronted with run away inflation. Many of them are finding it difficult to maintain middle class status on the salary of two working partners. The survival of Black people depends on the strength of their families. This course will discuss the African and Southern roots of the Black family. It will look at the Black family from an historical perspective in order to understand the contemporary issues confronting its existence.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science, MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., MJ-AMER- African-Amer Studies, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA, SS-Sch Core-Consc & Society

SOCI 245 - CRIMINOLOGY
An analysis of theories of criminal behavior and the social forces that have contributed to formulations of criminal law and rehabilitation policy. Actual functions of the criminal justice system will be explored, with an emphasis on prisons.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course
All Sections for this Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

SOCI 248 - CRIME AND MEDIA
Sociologists conceptualize culture in myriad ways, but are particularly interested in how institutions shape cultural norms. Media are ubiquitous in modern life, and a primary conduit for the communication of culture. This course uses sociological theory, both classic and contemporary, to examine how media shape such norms with respect to how we understand crime and the criminal justice system in the context of the American cultural landscape. Particular attention is paid to how media reinforce harmful stereotypes, inequality, and marginality. Students will examine both historical and current cultural artifacts (films, TV shows, comic books, news stories, songs, etc...) and learn to analyze the artifacts through the lens of communication and criminological theories. We will examine how media representations construct social reality, and the effect of this on perceptions of crime, and criminal justice policies. Special attention is paid to cultural constructions of the “newsworthiness” of crime stories, and how journalistic practice contributes to inaccurate public information about crime and criminals. Finally, we review approaches used by social scientists to systematically study media representations and culture.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Culture & Creativity, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 250 - INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION & HUMAN RIGHTS
Every year between 2.5 and 4 million people cross international borders without authorization. Escaping war and civil conflict, political instability, ethnic violence, environmental disasters, and poverty, they search for a new home, and a chance to work with a livable pay. They are caught between borders in a borderless world. International Migration and Human Rights is a course about their lives, the causes of their displacements, and their treatment by others. International Migration and Human Rights shifts the focus of the study of the national interest of receiving and sending states to the human rights of the migrants. It helps the students to go beyond the popular nationalist narrative advocated by the media and politicians, to conduct a critical analysis of leading migration issues of our time. Evaluating the effects of globalization on migration, the increase in the number of people in need of protection, and the border policies of the United States and other affluent nations, the course calls for a reevaluation and reform of the existing international refugee and migration regimes.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

SOCI 255 - HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
FORMERLY: SOCI-340 This course examines a wide range of human rights issues that arise in the context of law enforcement. Focusing on how intergroup conflicts and stereotypes about social groups and categories intersect with law enforcement agents' discretionary power and responsibility to carry out State policy directives, this course seeks to sensitize students to the human rights implications of various law enforcement practices and policies. Students not only explore a comprehensive assortment of issues dealing with human rights and political repression, including surveillance, harassment, and arrest, to torture, assassination, and genocide, but also investigate the conceptual linkages between seemingly minor, idiosyncratic practices, such as harassment and bullying, to the most extreme, systematic practice of genocide. In addition, students analyze how both ideological concepts, sucy as stereotypes, and structural concepts, such as authorization, routinization, dehumanization, and visibility, contribute to otherwise law-abiding, seemingly "moral" individuals' participation in human rights violations. Emphasis is placed on understanding how "normal" institutional roles and practices can contribute to human rights violations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 260 - SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA AND POP CULTURE
This class is an introduction to the study of domestic and international media and popular culture as seen through a sociological lens, with a focus on issues of strucure and agency from a cultural perspective. Utilizing both contemporary and historical examples, the macro-level functioning of media as social institutions, as well as the microlevel interactions of humans with inedia forms and content are highlighted. The role of media in the social construction of identities, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability is a key element. Methodological approaches to systematically studying media and pop culture artifacts will be covered.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Culture & Creativity, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 290 - TOPICS

0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: SOCIOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Sociology Department

SOCI 302 - WOMEN AND GLOBAL POVERTY
This course uses a sociological perspective, complemented by historical, economic, political, and cultural approaches, to explore how strategies for international development have shaped women's lives. We will examine the assumptions behind common development indicators believed to reflect women's realities. For example, do higher levels of national economic growth mean that the living conditions for most women and their families in developing countries automatically improve? Does participation in the work force give women greater autonomy in the family? Special attention will be given to the cultural basis of women's roles in developing societies as well as structural shifts that are altering those roles. In addition to reading the latest analyses of the costs and benefits of development programs for women’s lives, we will conduct studies of social problems in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East to examine ways women creatively respond to socioeconomic constraints in their communities.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, Gen Ed 18-Syst, Sust&Society, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

SOCI 303 - SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE
This course is an introduction to the sociological study of culture. Its aim is to give the learner a foundation for understanding the basic dynamics of culture and the major contemporary controversies about culture. Secondly, this course is interested in the uses of sociology for a general introduction to the new field of Cultural Studies. We will, therefore, be engaging readings in both the Sociology of Culture and Cultural Studies with a view to bringing out their mutual contributions to an understanding of social change and social transformation.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 304 - GLOBALIZATION AND SOCIETY
Globalization and Society is a critical investigation of contemporary globalization. Relying on a wealth of literature in sociology and political economy, the course introduces the students to the role of power relations, class dynamics, institutional changes, laws and regulations, and market and non-market forces in shaping global capitalism. It illuminates the essential role of the state in regulating capital accumulation, particularly in times of crisis. Analyzing the history of globalization, the course presents a critical assessment of the Bretton Woods regime and its evolution, the rise of flexible accumulation, and the contradictions of neoliberalism. Globalization and Society ends with the economic crisis of 2008 and the challenges it poses to governments, and people around the world. This couse provides the students with the necessary tools to understand and alayze important global economic changes and trends.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, WRITING INTENSIVE

SOCI 307 - SOCIAL RESEARCH WITH COMPUTERS
An analysis of the logic of scientific inquiry as applied in the social sciences and related professions through a critical examination of the methodological practices of social scientists and the design and execution of research related to the student's interests and course of study. Students are introduced to the use of packaged computer programs for data analysis. Lab Fee. LAWS students should see instructor for waiver of prerequisite.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lab
All Sections for this Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

SOCI 308 - DATA ANALYSIS IN SOCIOLOGY
A study of the application of statistics in social research, utilizing available computer technology. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be taught. This course fulfills the statistics requirement for Sociology majors and the research requirement for Social Science Contract majors. Lab Fee.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 309 - FOOD AND POPULATION
A study of the social structures and processes that influence food production, distribution, consumption, and how each of these affect human populations in developed and developing societies. Malthusian, Marxist and Ecologically Sustainable perspectives will be examined. Subtopics include agriculture, diet and nutrition, genetically modified food, famine, corporate food promotion, and trade inequalities.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Syst, Sust&Society, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, SS-Sch Core-Sustainability

SOCI 315 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE
A consideration of the ways in which society defines deviance and the deviant individual, starting with the major theoretical perspectives on why socially prohibited behavior occurs and how we make sense of deviance. The course will examine how social structures deal with deviants and the adaptive behavior of those identified as deviant. Of particular importance is the role which persons in political power or those who enforce the law play in the labeling of acts and actors as deviant. The course will focus on a specific social category of deviants and their "careers" each semester it is offered.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

SOCI 317 - SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY: FIELDWORK
The Fieldwork in Sociology of Community does not meet as a class. Students must complete 96 hours of community work during the semester in a group or institution relevant to sociology. Each student will meet with the instructor individually during the semester to discuss his/her site work. As a final project, and based on their individual field practices, students will produce a paper that integrates both the field and classroom work. This course also fulfills the SSHS core fieldwork requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 330 - DEVELOPMENT IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION
The course is an introduction to the contemporary debate about the objectivity of modern science in a multicultural and globalizing world. Current reconstructions of the interconnected origins of western modernity and science are examined and used to define different perspectives on the history and philosophy of science. Cultural studies of science approaches are presented that compare science and other knowledge systems. In these contexts assessments of the social and cultural impacts of scientific knowledge and scientized-technologies are examined.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

SOCI 331 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
This course uses a sociological perspective, complemented by historical, economic, political, and cultural approaches, to explore how human beings engage religion to explain their worlds and their experiences, but also to take social action. We will examine important and renowned theories that aim to explain how collectivities of people create and use religion, and then we will apply those theories to present-day and past examples of religious faith and practice, in locales ranging from the southern United States, to West Africa, Latin America, and South Asia. We will find that people work within the cultural structures imposed by religion, but that they also perpetually shape and re-create religious beliefs and traditions as they use them to facilitate the challenges of living in communities of unequal power relations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Values and Ethics, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, SS-Sch Core-Consc & Society

SOCI 332 - SOCIAL THEORY
This course introduces the social theories of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber and illustrates how these theories have been renewed as ongoing research programs. Systematic attention is given to the issues of validating concept and theory formation and the debate about "objectivity" and ideology in social theory. These theoretical perspectives are also used to introduce the normative debate about the globalization of modern civil society in a multicultural world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 335 - PUBLIC SOCIOLOGIES
The Public Sociology course permits students to bring their sociological training into the surrounding immediate civil society and public sphere. The course will engage a specific public theme each year that it is offered. For example, cultural differences and Muslim communities in New Jersey: migrants and labor markets in New Jersey. Students will familiarize themselves with the academic literature on the subject and then research it empirically in the field. The intent of the course is for students to examine public issues, and be involved in research that will be useful to the groups being studied and the larger community.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 345 - RACE, CRIME AND JUSTICE
This course involves an in-depth, comprehensive look at the relationship between race and crime in the United States. In disentangling the complex relationship between race and crime, this course examines both racialized ideological constructions and perceptions of crime, as well as institutional policies and practices, including seemingly race-neutral ones, that contribute to racially disparate outcomes both within and outside of the criminal justice system. Analysis of racialized perceptions and constructions of crime focuses not only on how such perceptions and constructions shape criminal justice practices and processes such as deployment, stops, arrests, detention, charges, convictions, sentencing, and incarceration, but also how they affect where people live and send their children to school. In investigating criminal justice outcomes, this course takes a critical look at a number of taken-for-granted assumptions in both conventional and scholarly explanations of race and crime. For instance, rather than assuming that there is a neat conceptual distinction between extra-legal variables such as race, ethnicity, class, and age, and legal variables such as the seriousness of offense and prior record, this course looks at how race shapes these extra-legal variables. Similarly, rather than assuming that racial steroetypes regarding criminality affect law enforcement practices in the same way across spaces and communities, this course looks at how a variety of community level variables result in different practices regardless of whatever pre-existing racial stereotypees harbored by law enforcement officers.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies

SOCI 361 - GENDER, WORK, AND FAMILY
This course will examine the changing nature of the family and the workplace with an emphasis on the impact of gender in these two spheres. We will focus on specific social and historical changes which have altered the structure of the domestic realms of work and the dynamics of the relationship between men and women. Special attention will be given to such issues as equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, pay equity (comparable worth), parental leaves, sexual harassment, and the effects of globalization on women's labor, in the United States and the developing world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCI 390 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. SOCI 390 - CRIMES OF THE INTERNET: This course will examine various crimes committed through computers and the Internet, such as identity theft, online fraud, computer hacking, and cyber-bullying, and explore how these different types of cyber crimes challenge traditional approaches of investigation and prosecution. The course also will assess the applicability of the 1st and 4th Amendments to Internet/computer crimes. In addition, a component of the course will analyze the role of the Internet in terrorist-related crimes, as well as law enforcement's efforts to combat terrorism. SOCI 390 - CRISIS MANAGEMENT: Managing crises in public organization is a vital aspect of public administration, whether the cause of the crisis is internal or external. This course examines crises and conflict resolution in interpersonal and organizational contexts. The course uses theory from behavioral and social sciences to assess, manage, and resolve crisis and conflict situations in a criminal justice environment. It includes the nature of and responses to crisis and conflict, as well as strategies for resolving them. SOCI 390 - SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT: Sociology of Sport investigates the institution of organized sport from a sociological perspective. This course not only examines sport as a microcosm of society, but also as a site where society is created, reproduced, and changed. Starting with the premise that sports are social constructions, Sociology of Sport looks at the cultural meanings that people attach to sports, the relationship between sports and the creation and violation of social norms, and the ways in which sports are structured, that is, set up and organized, to produce and reinforce relationships between different categories of people. The course devotes particular attention to the relationship of sport to various forms of stratification and sociocultural shifts in society.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

SOCI 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: SOCIOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Sociology Department

SOCI 410 - CAPSTONE PROJECT IN SOCIOLOGY
"What can someone do with a sociology degree?" Sociology is a discipline which enables thinkers to understand and critique the problems of contemporary societies, and which prepares students for a wide variety of entry-level jobs in our present-day, globally diverse and demanding workforce, as well as for a range of professions that demand a critical, socially-oriented, undergraduate academic background for future training. This course is designed to enable you to use your sociology training at Ramapo College for success in your future positions in the labor market or graduate academic settings. It will ensure that upon graduation with a bachelor's degree in Sociology, you can understand classical and contemporary lines of thought in the discipline, be experienced in empirical research, use sociological texts to theorize about your findings, work with others to evaluate your results, write a sociological paper in professional format, and present your work in a public forum. A portion of this course is also dedicated to guiding your search for social science related jobs or graduate school programs upon your completion of the sociology major at Ramapo.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Sociology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

SOCI 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department

SOCI 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Sociology Department


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