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Fall 2019
Nov 30,2020
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PSYC 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PSYCHOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Psychology Department

PSYC 101 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
An introduction to psychology as a field of study and practice. The history, methods, and scope of psychology will be explored. Topics will include learning, perception, cognition, emotion, motivation, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, social behavior, personality, development across the lifespan, and the biological bases of thought, feeling, and action.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PSYCHOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for coursework on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Psychology Department

PSYC 202 - PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
A consideration of theory and research on the basic process of learning and memory from simple conditioning in animals to more complex cognitive processes in humans. The course will include laboratory research and demonstrations. Intended for Psychology students. Lab Fee. Fulfills Category 2 requirement. IFormerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 205 - THE ETHICAL SELF
This course discusses some of life’s basic questions. How do we construct our ‘self? “What has the greatest influence on our ‘selfgour past, present or future‘? How can we act as an Ethical Self? ln this course. ‘self’ is understood as complex, constituted through the dialectic among processes at societal, local and ‘personal’ (i.e., agentive) levels. The self, so created, is deeply influenced by societal discourses (e.g., gender, race, class), and can be seen as hybrid and filled with tensions. For example, a woman may be career oriented, yet also deeply committed to motherhood. These two aspects of her ‘self’ sometimes pull her in opposing directions, causing tension and ambiguity. Our goal in this course is to conceptualize the Ethical Self: One who understands the ‘self as cohesive despite the presence of tension. So too, the Ethical Self approaches ambiguity with tolerance rather than intolerance. We will pay special attention to one’s economic status in this course, and the affect that inequity of resources can have on identity construction.We will read about scholars such as Charles Pierce, Hans Vaihinger, Maria Lugones, Gloria Anzaldua, James Fowler and Lawrence Kohlberg. As you work through these readings, you will be guided by a series of keystone questions, such as those above, that will help you to engage more deeply with the readings. This is cross listed as PHIL205 -- The Ethical Self.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Values and Ethics

PSYC 206 - ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY
This course will initially introduce students to the philosophy of ethics, applying a range of philosophical positions to various dilemmas in the field of psychology. How these philosophical positions are interpreted with regard to various Codes of Ethics in the helping professions will also be examined. This will be followed by a review of the specific debates that underlie, and/or result from, various schools of thought in the field of psychology. Next, specific controversies within the field of psychology will be examined, with the hope that these will be understood within the context of the larger philosophical positions covered earlier in the semester. Finally, some of the salient legal issues, such as patient confidentiality, research ethics and practitioner malpractice in the field of psychology will be addressed.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Values and Ethics

PSYC 209 - PSYCHOLOGY OF PERCEPTION
The study of perception is one of the oldest areas of psychological speculation and research. It raises many interesting questions about mind, reality, truth and aesthetic experience. We will approach the study of perception historically by showing how it developed in parallel within philosophy, science and art, with each approach providing important insights for the other. Our basic question will concern the relations that exist between descriptions of the physical world, our brain, and our experience. We will investigate what modern research has to say about the ways in which we experience color, object, space, motion and event perception. Aspects of the visual arts will be discussed in this context, both as employing perceptual principles and helping to reveal them. Fulfills Category 2 requirement. (Formerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 212 - PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
A chronological, cross-cultural study of life stages--middle age, old age, and death--as experienced in terms of crises in life patterns and changing social institutions. Fulfills Category 3 requirement. (Formerly Category 4)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

PSYC 215 - LEARNING, COGNITION, AND TEACHING
A survey of relevant findings in psychology and allied fields that illuminate the mechanisms and strategies by which people learn, or fail to learn, in various contexts and settings. The course reviews the conceptual foundations of the field of learning and illustrates the relevance of various perspectives in gaining a full appreciation of the topics and understanding how they apply to classroom practice. Finally, a unifying theme or issue is selected and studied in terms of the various perspectives. This course is primarily intended for students who are working towards certification in Teacher Education. Fulfills requirement for a psychology elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

PSYC 218 - FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to introduce students to the many ways in which psychology and the law intersect. Topics to be addressed include research on eyewitness accuracy, research on jury processes, expert witnesses in the field of psychology, evaluations of competence to stand trial, insanity defenses, psychologists as consultants in jury selection, the psychology of hate crimes, false confessions, and criminal profiling. We will also discuss ethical issues that arise at this intersection of psychology and law.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 220 - THE PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA
This course will critically review the philosophical psychology of classical Indian yoga. These theories and practices will be discussed in relation to traditional South Indian cultural context of Hindu and Buddhist thought and various schools of Indian philosophy and traditional medicine. This approach will be integrally applied to contemporary clinical theory and practice in psychology. Fulfills Elective requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 226 - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Examination of the social aspects of thought, feeling, and actions. Topics will include: the relationship between attitudes and behavior, the formation of social beliefs such as first impressions of others, norms, roles (including sex roles), obedience and conformity, persuasion, group dynamics, aggression, altruism, prejudice, liking, and loving. Fulfills Category 1 requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

PSYC 227 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
This course will provide an overview of the theories and methods used in the study of human cognitive processes, as well as give the student an opportunity to experience first-hand some of the phenomena within cognitive psychology. Some of the topics covered will be attention, memory, language, and problem solving. Fulfills Category 2 requirement. (Formerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course
All Sections for this Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 231 - MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course will provide students with an opportunity to be immersed in an ethnicity-centered psychological perspective with respect to the cultural and racial diversity that exists in the United States. Students will enlarge their perspective to a more global one, learn to appreciate similarities and differences, and engage in a paradigm shift in our method of understanding African-Americans, Latinos/Latinas, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans. Fulfills Category 4 requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science, MJ-Amer-Race & Ethnicity, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

PSYC 239 - CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to examine the impact of cultural factors on human psychological processes. The thesis that human cognition, behavior, and affect are only meaningful when viewed in the socio-cultural context in which they develop will be examined. Methodological issues associated with the conduct of cross-cultural research, and a review of empirical research will be emphasized. Fulfills Category 4 requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science

PSYC 240 - PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING AND MEASUREMENT
This course is an introduction to the theory of psychological testing and measurement as well as issues surrounding the topic. Psychological testing will be discussed in multiple contexts, including (but not limited to) organizational, clinical, and educational settings. Coverage will include such topics as reliability, validity, test construction, and the measurement of ability, personality, and achievement. Additionally, the legal, ethical, and sociocultural implications of testing and measurement will be examined. The course has an applied focus; students will learn how to evaluate, interpret, and design psychological tests and measures they may encounter in their lives.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 241 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
This is a course designed to introduce the student to the basic processes of lifespan human development. The course attempts to explain the complexities of human development by drawing from multiple theoretical standpoints (psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, contextual, sociocultural, biological, etc.). The major influences on and the key debates in lifespan development will be explored in detail. Developmental issues will be explored using a transactional approach. Fulfills Category 3 requirement. (Formerly Category 4)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

PSYC 242 - STATISTICS
An introduction to statistics with examples from the behavioral sciences, especially psychology. The course will cover techniques for describing observations, including frequency distributions, stem plots, graphs, averages, measures of variability, and co-efficients of correlation; and techniques for drawing inferences from observations, including regression, hypothesis testing, and confidence intervals. Prerequisite: a college-level mathematics course or permission of instructor. Students matriculated at Ramapo must have satisfied the General Education mathematics requirement. Highly recommended for all psychology majors, especially for students planning to attend graduate programs in psychology. Fulfills requirement for a psychology elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 263 - CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
A study of the growth, development, and behavior of children with a focus in infancy and early childhood. Relevant theories and research findings will be presented relating to physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development and their interaction. Emphasis will be placed on the many different factors that influence behavior and its development. Students will learn to relate facts, theories, and methods of child psychology to everyday problems and real-world concerns. How our historical changing conceptions of childhood and children affect research and practice will also be addressed. Fulfills Category 3 requirement. (Formerly Category 4)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 290 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. PSYC 290 AGGRESSION. Aggression is a topic which inspires research, challenges theory, and presents troublesome issues that haunt society. This course will examine various approaches that scholars have employed to understand violence and aggressive behavior. Contributions to be considered will include those from evolutionary theory, animal behavior, and social, cognitive, developmental, and political psychology. Fulfills requirement for a psychology elective. PSYC290: PSYC OF COMMUNITY: The course will examine the object and the development of the discipline across the Globe. It will focus, specially, on Critical Community Psychology. Topics will include: Action research, Sense of community, Place attachment, Social support and capital, social change and power, Ecological perspective, Well-being promotion, Projects Designing and Evaluation, Community diagnosis tools, as Community Profiling, Individual interviews and Focus groups, Photovoice, Community maps and walks. Community Psychologist works in several contexts and communities (Local town administration, advocacy and neighborhood committees, T-groups, organizations, Mental health and Social services facilities, schools, co-housing etc) in the role of "Participant Conceptualizer" and “Social Catalyst” to enable an actual participative process in the community. As expert of the“process” and intervention in social systems, the goal of the community psychologist is to promote change, co-creating “bottom-up” knowledge and activating conditions for the “liberation” from oppression.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PSYCHOLOGY
An opportunity to work on a one-to-one basis with one of the psychology faculty. ONLY WHEN this course involves: (1) the design, implementation, analysis, and write-up of a hands-on, experiential research project carried out in collaboration with one of the psychology faculty; (2) a substantive experiential contribution to a faculty member's research project; or (3) the completion of requirements for a fieldwork course; will it fulfill Category 7 requirement for the psychology major or the independent study/fieldwork requirement for the School of Social Science/Human Services.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Psychology Department

PSYC 303 - RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY
A consideration of the conduct of research in psychology. Topics will include the philosophy of scientific research, ethical questions in psychological research, use of library resources, quantification in psychology, the use of psychological tests and research apparatus, the collection and analysis of data, an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, and reporting of research. There will be a lecture, laboratory exercises, and written reports. Students will have an opportunity to further develop their psychological reading and writing skills. Fulfills research methods requirement. Lab Fee.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lab, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 304 - DATA ANALYSIS IN PSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to introduce students to the elements of statistical analysis used in psychological research. It is expected that this course will allow students to critically evaluate published research and to design, collect, and analyze their own empirical data sets. Both quantitative and qualitative forms of analysis will be included. The course will focus on the relationship between research design and data analysis.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 305 - ETHOLOGY: ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
The study of animal behavior in psychological research. Topics covered include animal models for understanding general principles of behavior (normal and abnormal); history of comparative psychology; ethology; human ethology; socio-biology; zoomorphism; anthropomorphism; ethics of animal experimentation. Animal behavior will be explored in terms of its evolution, function, development, and physiology. Fulfills Elective requirement. (Formerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 310 - NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of clinical neuropsychology. This course will review the anatomy and basic function of the brain, particularly that of the cerebral cortex. Major neuropsychological dysfunctions related to brain damage, as well as what neurological disorders can reveal about normal brain functioning, will be presented. Students will also gain an understanding of the typical assessment tools and procedures used for diagnosing neuropsychological disorders. Fulfills Category 6. (Formerly Category 2)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 311 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
This course is an extensive exploration of what it means to be a person in contemporary, gendered, American society. In particular, students will examine how gender is acquired, maintained, and resisted in our everyday lives. We will discuss diverse perspectives on gender, ranging from biological and developmental to social structural approaches. Examples of class topics include media constructions of femininity and masculinity, sexual orientation, racial and cultural critiques of feminist psychology, violence in intimate relationships, gender and mental health, gender development, gender in the workplace, and gender-based harassment. Fulfills Category 4 requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality

PSYC 314 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
An examination of various forms of emotional disturbance. Students gain an appreciation of the value judgments involved in defining terms like "abnormal behavior" and "mental illness." We will review the definitions, history, and major models of psychopathology. This overview will be followed by an examination of the major disorders (e.g. schizophrenia, depression, phobias, and so on) with emphasis on symptoms, causes, and treatment. Theoretical perspectives and current research (including genetic and biochemical research) are considered for each of the disorders. Fulfills Category 5 requirement. (Formerly Category 2)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 319 - ADULT PSYCHOLOGY FIELDWORK
An applied study of adult psychology. Students will spend the equivalent of one-day-per-week working in a practicum assignment--a residence, day program, or hospice for senior citizens. Like all fieldwork courses, this course requires a substantial term paper based on library research from the professional journals that is integrated with the practicum experience. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Fulfills Category 7 and fieldwork requirements. Fieldwork Liability Fee. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 320 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY FIELDWORK
An applied study of psychopathology. Students spend the equivalent of one day (6-8 hours) per week over the course of the semester (11 weeks) working in a practicum assignment, e.g., outpatient clinic; program for children with learning disabilities, hyperactivity, or autism; mental hospital or institution for people diagnosed with mental retardation. As most mental health services agencies tend to be open during the hours of 9am to 3:30pm, students should leave one day free in their schedules to accommodate fieldwork placement. Like all fieldwork courses, this requires a substantial term paper based on library research from professional psychology journals integrated with the practicum experience. In addition to the hours spent at the practicum agency, students also attend class on campus every week. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Fulfills Category 7 and fieldwork requirements. Fieldwork Insurance Fee. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 321 - THEORIES OF PERSONALITY
(FORMERLY PSYC 211) Personality Theory is a branch of psychology that attempts to account for personal consistency and stability across situations and over time. This course presents an overview of the major issues, controversies, and theories found in this field. Fulfills Category 5 requirement. (Formerly Category 2)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 326 - LOVE AND SEXUALITY
An introduction to the field of relationship science. Students will examine love and intimacy from developmental, psychological, socio-cultural, and historical perspectives. Students will consider the development of interpersonal attraction, the role of socio-cultural contexts on relationships, theories of love and relationship development, sexual behavior in the context of intimacy, common problems in relationships, and the application of psychology in the development of therapeutic interventions for relationship problems. Does NOT count as an elective in the Biology major. Fulfills psychology elective requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality

PSYC 335 - SEXUALITIES & GENDER IDENTITIES: LGBTQA+
In this course, we will explore the diversity and complexity of sexuality and gender identities. Through readings, assignments, and class discussions we will examine the interactions and intersections of gender, ethnicity, physical abilities and social status in relation to sexual orientation and experience. You are encouraged to think critically of how we think about, feel, learn, experience, and characterize such an important aspect of the human experience: our sexual selves. Through a variety of theoretical approaches and perspectives, we will examine how our world provides the framework for our personal psychologies as sexual beings, and how gender norms frame the influence our understanding of ourselves and others.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality

PSYC 339 - FIELDWORK WITH ADOLESCENTS
This course will expand your knowledge of adolescent psychology through the unique experience of working in the field, while sharing that experience with your student peers. Through readings for the course, class discussions, classroom presentations and in-class workshps, we will work together to explore the complexities of adolescent experience. Through your own work in the field and the completion of a term paper, you will learn the connections of theory and practice. Together we will explore a variety of issues concerning the adolescent experience in the U.S. today, including, but not limited to: diverse experiences of adolescence related to gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, ability, and SES; physical changes and society's responses to those changes; as well as issues of psychological struggle, abuse, and bullying. We will also discuss a variety of approaches toward working with people in the adolecent stage of life. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Administration and Fieldwork Liability Insurance Fee. Fulfills Category 7 requirement. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 343 - ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
The design of this class attempts to balance an introduction to the field of Environmental Psychology with opportunities to experience first hand our personal and collective relationship to our environmental surround. Fulfills Elective requirement. (Formerly Category 1)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA, SS-Sch Core-Sustainability

PSYC 345 - WORKPLACE PSYCHOLOGY
This course will examine the field of lndustrial-Organizational Psychology, which is the scientific study of psychological theory and research applied to the workplace. The goals of this field include helping employees perform better at their jobs as well as enjoy their jobs more. These two general themes will be discussed in the course as well as specific topics which include: recruiting and hiring employees, leadership, teamwork, training and development, psychological testing, performance appraisal, employee motivation, and stress in the workplace. Fulfills Psychology Category 1 requirement. As a hybrid course, a major goal of this course will be for you to apply the concepts to your own work-life and career goals. The course is designed to benefit anyone who will ever have a job, regardless of whether you want to be an I-O Psychologist or not.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 347 - ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY
In this course we will explore the diverse psychological experiences of a unique time of life: adolescence. Through readings, assignments, and class discussions we will examine the interactions of the social world and the self, and how adolescents' perceive, cope, and grow through a myriad of social expectations and personal experiences. Gender, race/ethnicity, physical abilities, social class, and sexual orientations and identities will be central to our analyses throughout the course. It is hoped that, through the work we do in this classroom, students will emerge with a greater appreciation of the complexity of adolescence, and a stronger capacity to engage in positive relationships with adolescents in areas of work and in personal life. Fulfills Category 3 requirement. (Formerly Caegory 4)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 349 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
In this course we will explore the diverse psychological and life experiences of women, as well as investigate what it means to "be" a "woman." Through research and feminist theory, students will investigate topics ranging from work, education, gendered development in childhood and adolescence, to gender based violence, relationships, media influence on women, as well as gender in relation to power and status. How gender interacts with race/ethnicity, sexuality, dis/abilities, age, socioeconomic status, and other variables, will be attended to throughout the course. It is hoped that through participation in this course, students will develop a fuller understanding of how gender influences the lives of women, and can reflect on how gender has influenced their own lives, relationships, and perceptions of the world. Fulfills Category 4 requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality

PSYC 352 - BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
(FORMERLY: PSYC 245) An introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Topics will include: evolution and animal behavior; the brain and central nervous system; visual and auditory perception; and brain behavior relationships (neural regulation of hunger, sleep, consciousness, aggression, sex, and drug action). Also discussed will be ethical issues in brain control. Fulfills Category 6 requirement. (Formerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 353 - COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
This course will be concerned with how brain activity and structure support cognitive processes. We will discuss the findings of researchers who have applied advances in neuroscience to the investigagion of cognition, perception, memory, language and other high level cognitive processes. There will be a focus on understanding the methods used in cognitive neuroscience. Historical and cutting-edge research will be explored. Implications within the larger context of the field of psychology will also be considered. Fulfills Category 6 requirement. (Formerly Category 3)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 355 - NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
This course surveys basic neuropharmacology, neurophysiology, neurotransmitter system, the effects of various psychotropic drugs and the actions of drugs used to treat mental disorders. The emphasis of the first part of the course is on basic principles of neuropharmacology, distribution and elimination of drugs, drug-receptor interactions and dose-response relationships, structure of neurons, neurophysiological mechanisms involved in synaptic activity and the distribution of specific neurotransmitter systems. The last two-thirds of the course examine the actions of specific drugs and their effects on behavior with a special emphasis on contemporary designer drugs. Upon successful completion of this course you should be able to: Demonstrate knowledge of the theory and research on pharmacology, neurotransmitter systems and the effects of psychotropic drugs on the brain and behavior. Use the concepts, language, and major theories of psychopharmacology. Use critical thinking effectively in context of course material.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 357 - CHILDHOOD DISORDERS
A study of childhood psychopathology. In this couse students will examine frameworks for conceptualizing "abnormal behavior" in the context of child development, the nature of research in childhood disorders, psychological assessment methods commonly used in working with children, and the various causes and treatments of disorders most commonly experienced during childhood. Students may enroll concurrently in the fieldwork component of the course (PSYC 358), which provides opportunities for direct experience with children challenged by psychological problems. Fulfills Category 5 requirement. (Formerly: Elective)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 358 - CHILDHOOD DISORDERS FIELDWORK
An applied study of childhood disorders. This course is to be taken in conjunction with PSYC 357 or after completing PSYC 357, and serves to expand knowledge of child psychopathology in an applied setting. This fieldwork course provides an opportunity for students to examine various applications of psychology theory to the field of childhood psychopathology. Through applied experiences, in-class learning activities, research and writing, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of childhood disorders that incorporates psychological as well as genetic, biological, social and cultural factors. Students will spend 60 hours working in a field placement that serves children experiencing and/or at risk of childhood disorders. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placement is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Fulfills Category 7 requirement. Fieldwork Insurance Fee. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 365 - EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY
Why does jealousy occur? The evolutionary explanation calls it an adaptation, a heritable mating strategy that arose by accident in our remote ancestors and spread into later generations because it fostered success in reproduction by motivating the guarding of one's mate against rivals. This course will critically examine such evolutionary thinking in contemporary psychology as it is being applied to the whole gamut of human behavior, including child development, perception, cognition, consciousness, emotion, motivation, learning, gender, intelligence, personality, psychopathology, group dynamics, courtship, and parenting. We will devote special attention to the psychological foundations of culture, including religion, and the controversies sparked by evolutionary psychology. Fulfills Elective requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 366 - BEHAVIOR THERAPY
A survey of the learning principles and research methodology that form the basis of behavior therapy. The course will examine techniques based on learning principles as they are applied to clinical problems in outpatient therapy, mental hospitals, schools, residences for mentally retarded individuals, and schools for special children. Students will complete a research project on themselves utilizing the principles of behavior change. Ethical problems raised by the practice of behavior therapy will also be considered. Fulfills Category 5 requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 367 - FIELDWORK WITH CHILDREN
An applied study of child psychology. This course is best taken in conjunction with or after completing PSYC 263. This course provides students with an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in a field experience focused on child development. Students will spend the equivalent of one-day-per-week volunteering in a practicum assignment, e.g., a preschool or school for children, an after-school program for children. Class meetings and requirements are focused on supportung the development of students' abilities to integrate knowledge and experience. As most community service agencies tend to be open during the hours of 9am to 3:30pm, students should leave one day free in their schedules to accommodate fieldwork placement. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Fulfills Category 7 requirement. Fieldwork Insurance Fee. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course
All Sections for this Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 368 - FIELDWORK IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
An applied study of the field of forensic psychology. This course is designed to expand students' knowledge of forensic psychology, and to provide hands-on experience in a relevant field placement. During the semester, we will examine in class a variety of topics that illustrate the applications of psychological concepts to the practice of the law and the criminal justice system. Students will then have the opportunity to apply their knowledge of theory and research to practice in forensic settings. Placements will be available in such areas as community services to victims, forensic mental health agencies, parole and corrections, and the court system. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. All students must pass a criminal background check as well as a drug screen in order to be placed with an agency and complete this fieldwork course; students who fail either the baackground check or the drug screen will be asked to withdraw from the course. Fulfills Category 7 and fieldwork requirement. Fieldwork Insurance Fee. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Fieldwork, Hybrid

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 388 - CO-OP/INTERNSHIP PSYCHOLOGY
An opportunity to apply psychology to a job off-campus. The student will be placed in a work assignment related to psychology by a member of the Center for Experiential Learning. The student's work in the agency will be evaluated by a supervisor at the work site. The academic content of the course will be planned with and evaluated by a member of the psychology faculty, and the grade for the course will be submitted by the psychology faculty member. Only when this course includes completion of a substantial term paper based on research from professional journals in the library that is integrated with the student's field experience will it fulfill Category 6 requirement for the psychology major and the fieldwork requirement. Students must register with the Center for Experiential Learning and fill out their contract forms that require the collaboration and signature of the sponsoring psychology faculty member. Students may take up to two Co-ops in their academic career at Ramapo College. Transfer students must have completed at least 16 credits at Ramapo.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Co-Op

Psychology Department

PSYC 390 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PSYCHOLOGY
An opportunity to work on a one-to-one basis with one of the psychology faculty. ONLY WHEN this course involves: (1) the design, implementation, analysis, and write-up of a hands-on, experiential research project carried out in collaboration with one of the psychology faculty; (2) a substantive experiential contribution to a faculty member's research project; or (3) the completion of requirements for a fieldwork course will it fulfill Category 7 requirement for the psychology major or the independent study/fieldwork requirement for the School of Social Science/Human Services.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Psychology Department

PSYC 413 - PHILOSOPHICAL ROOTS OF PSYCHOLOGY
A study of the philosophical foundations of psychology from an historical perspective. The course includes an analysis of the development of psychological theory, emphasizing the relationship between current theories and historical solutions to contemporary problems in psychology. The interplay between psychology, philosophy, society and religion during the time period from the ancient Greeks to Wundt and German physiological psychology will be highlighted. Fulfills Elective requirement. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 420 - CONTEMPLATIVE PSYCHOLOGY
This capstone seminar will examine the psychology of mindfulness meditation practice from the perspectives of: (1) The traditional systems of contemplative practices (Samkaya-yoga, Theravada, Vajrayana, and Mahayana Buddhism. Lectio divina, kabbala); (2) Contemorary phenomenological psychology; (3) Social neuropsychology and social/developmental psychology (including cultural psychology); (4) Contemplative psychotherapy; and (5) Empathy training. In addition to readings and discussions, the seminar will require experiential training in relevant contemplative practices (e.g., breath-focused mindful attention, yoga practices, mindful listening, reflective group activities, and reflective journaling). Furthermore, students will conduct a descriptive phenomenological research project on some aspect of contemplative practice. The organizing questions of the seminar will be: How have the historical contemplative traditions replied to the perennial psychological concerns with (1) how to live a meaningful and wholesome life? (2) how to cope with suffering and trauma? and (3) how to enhance our powers of empathy and generosity with other people.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 422 - BEHAVIOR THERAPY FIELDWORK
Students spend the equivalent of one-day-per-week over the course of the semester working in a mental health agency or program that employs behavior therapy techniques, e.g., a school, a program for children diagnosed with a learning disability or hyperactivity, a facility for people diagnosed with mental retardation, an in-home or school program for individuals diagnosed with autism or Asperger's Syndrome, a residence for emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded adults or children. As most mental health services agencies tend to be open during the hours of 9am to 3:30pm, students should leave one day free in their schedules to accommodate fieldwork placement. Like all fieldwork courses, this course requires a substantial term paper based on library research from the professional journals that is integrated with the practicum experience. In addition to the practicum hours, students meet in class to process the internship experience and other course assignments. Due to obligations to community agencies and their clients, admission to fieldwork placements is at the discretion of the psychology faculty. Fulfills Category 6 and fieldwork requirements. Fieldwork Insurance Fee.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

PSYC 423 - HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY
A study of current conflicts in psychological theory stemming from long-standing historical problems. This course will analyze several major 19th and 20th century psychological systems, covering such topics as: structuralism, functionalism, psychoanalysis, William James and pragmatism, Gestalt psychology, dynamic psychology, phenomenology, humanism, and existentialism. Fulfills Elective requiremenht. (Formerly Category 5)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

PSYC 430 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: All sections of PSYC 430 require PSYC 303/PSYC 304 as prerequisites; students must also have junior/senior academic standing. Fulfills Category 8 requirement. PSYC 430 NEUROSIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY: Psychology, born from the disciplines of Philosophy and Physiology, has long sought to provide insight into the nature of the mind. Some of the classic questions include: What is the relationship between the mind and the body? Is the mind the same thing as the brain or is it something else? How can mere thoughts cause things to happen in a physical universe? Is it merely a delusion on our part to believe that our thoughts matter in the grand scheme of the universe? Recent progress in Neuroscience is profoundly altering our conception of how we think, feel, decide, love and even reproduce. Therefore, Neurophilosophy is a recent sub-discipline arising from the intersections of neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. PSYC 430 CULTURE AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. We are prepared both by our cultural and biological heritage. The course will provide an overview of current theory and research related to the multidimensional phenomena of human development across the life course. Emphasis will be placed on using a continuous dynamic model to study biological as well as psychosocial development as this allows for both risk and protective factors to be identified. PSYC 430 PSYCHOLOGY OF YOGA. Yoga is the most ancient of psychological systems while also growing in its influence on contemporary culture. This course will offer students an academic and applied introduction to the philosophical psychology of Classical Indian Yoga. Based on the primary ancient text of Patanjali and nature, mind-body holism, knowledge, ethics, human development, psychopathology, and of course, the general practice of holistic health workshops on nutrition, breath exercises, classic postures, and meditation. As much as possible, material will be taught in a manner that integrates yoga with contemporary cognitive-behavioral, neuroscience, psychodynamic and existential-phenomenological approaches to psychology. Students will be required to maintain experiential journals, actively participate in workshps, and conduct a rigorous academic research project. PSYC 430 THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. This course will introduce students to the paradigm of Existential-Phenomenological Psychology. The thought of Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty will be applied to the issues of both psychopathological disintegration and wholesome self-actualization or integration. Special emphasis will be placed on the human capacity for moral choice in the face of biological and cultural restraints. Phenomenology's consonance with psychoanalysis, especially Erik Erikson's epigenetic theory of psycho-social development, will be stressed throughout the course. PSYC 430 CONTEMPLATIVE PSYCHOLOGY: This capstone seminar will examine the psychology of mindfulness meditation practice from the perspectives of: (1) The traditional systems of contemplative practices (Samkaya-yoga, Theravada, Vajrayana, and Mahayana Buddhism. Lectio divina, kabbala); (2) Contemorary phenomenological psychology; (3) Social neuropsychology and social/developmental psychology (including cultural psychology); (4) Contemplative psychotherapy; and (5) Empathy training. In addition to readings and discussions, the seminar will require experiential training in relevant contemplative practices (e.g., breath-focused mindful attention, yoga practices, mindful listening, reflective group activities, and reflective journaling). Furthermore, students will conduct a descriptive phenomenological research project on some aspect of contemplative practice. The organizing questions of the seminar will be: How have the historical contemplative traditions replied to the perennial psychological concerns with (1) how to live a meaningful and wholesome life? (2) how to cope with suffering and trauma? and (3) how to enhance our powers of empathy and generosity with other people. PSYC 430 PSYC MEMORY: Mistaken eyewitness identifications are a leading cause of false imprisonment. In this course we examine the history of research on memory with special reference to eyewitness testimony, acceptance of expert testimony by courts, and contemporary research on identification, child testimony, what jurors believe about memory, and interviewing.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 431 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: CHILD MALTREATMENT
This seminar is designed to examine the topic of child abuse from a psychological perspective. We will focus on exploring the psychological and social factors that influence the development and experience of various forms of child abuse. We will identify various risk and protective factors as well as the impact of child abuse on the development and psychological well-being of “victims and their families. Lastly, we will evaluate the problem of child abuse from a social/ contextual perspective and discuss the various mechanisms for preventing and responding to abuse.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 432 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PSYCHOLOGY OF CULTS
This seminar is designed to explore the social psychological underpinnings of alternative groups (religious, criminal, and political) in various societies. We will explore the mechanisms through which "cults" attract members, keep members, and in some cases lure members into behaviors they might not otherwise engage in. It is not the intention of this seminar to paint all "cults" as bad or dangerous; there have been many cult-like groups that have operated throughout history that were quite beneficial for their members. Further, we will be discussing groups which were once considered cults but would now be considered mainstream religions. This course fulfills the advanced topics requirement in the psychology major.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 433 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PSYCHOPATHY
The psychopath has been described as possessing an absence of real emotional experience, an inability to be truthful and sincere, a lack of remorse or shame, and superficial charm. Some of the themes covered in this course will be: a greater understanding of the components of the psychopathic personality, how psychopathy is conceptualized and psychopathy assessment. Please note: Both readings and videos include material that can be considered offensive and upsetting (violence, sexual themes, obscenity, etc.). If you feel that such themes will cause you discomfort, please notify me immediately.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 434 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: CULTURAL NATURE OF DEVELOPMENT
“Human development is a cultural process. As a biological species, humans are defined in terms of our cultural participation” (Rogoff, 2003). We are prepared both by our cultural and biological heritage. In this course, we examine the regularities that give meaning to the differences and similarities in communities; practices and traditions, and guide human development. The course will provide an overview of current theory and research related to the multidimensional phenomena of human development across the life course. Emphasis will be placed on using a continuous dynamic models (e.g., Ecological Model by Bronfenbrenner) to study biological as well as psychosocial development as this allows for both risk and protective factors to be identified. Social policies guided by developmental research will be examined and assessed in light of a broader understanding of cultural influences.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 435 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP
This course will examine psychological theories and research about leadership. The major theoretical perspectives of the field will be covered (including empirical research that has studied on the topic), as well as current trends and insights into the field. Leadership will be examined as an act, not just as a formal title. Additionally, the topic will be explored in multiple contexts, including organizational leadership, student leadership, and politics, as well as therapists and teachers as leaders (among other contexts). A substantial aspect of the course will entail the student exploring his or her own leadership qualities. Fulfills Psychology Category 8 requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 436 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PSYCHOANALYTIC THROUGHT - UNDERSTANDING THE UNCONSCIOUS
This course is designed to expose students to the power of the unconscious and its essential role in human personality and behavior. The primary focus will be an exploration of the work of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. This course will be particularly helpful for students considering careers in psychotherapy (e.g. psychology or social work majors) and will help foster a greater understanding of how to access and interpret unconscious material through dream interpretation, analysis of human narrative and the investigation of psychological defenses, to name a few.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 437 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PSYCHOLOGY OF HAPPINESS
The field of applied psychology has placed its attention primarily on pathology at the individual, social and organizational levels, and on its amelioration: what psychology can do to reduce human suffering. More recently, the field of psychology has broadened to examine positive experience and effective ways to pursue well-being, fulfillment, and happiness. In this course, students will examine scientific research focused on the nature of happiness and other positive aspects of human experience. We will examine theory and research and will apply that knowledge in developing research projects with the aim of expanding our understanding of happiness and other related constructs.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 438 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: SOCIAL JUSTICE AND PSYCHOLOGY
This course concerns the relationship between psychological science and social justice. We will examine this relationship through the lens of intersectionality, which examines the interrelation between systems of inequality, such as sexism, racism, classism, and heterosexism. Intersectionality calls for a social justice approach, whereby scholars engage in sustained efforts to work towards equality for all people in terms of rights, access to resources, and well-being. We will explore the application of intersectionality to psychological theory and methods, and discuss controversies over the role that psychology should play in social justice advocacy. We will examine psychological research that takes a social justice approach to topics such as education, mental health, and public policy. Finally, we will reflect on, and have the opportunity to participate in, social justice efforts as they relate to psychology.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 439 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: PHENOMENOLOGIAL PSYCHOLOGY
This senior capstone course will introduce students to the paradigm of Phenomenological Psychology. Phenomenology is the science of how we subjectively experience the world. It approaches psychology from within the standpoint of consciousness. Phenomenological psychologists apply qualitative methodology to comprehend phenomena that are not accessible to the experimental methods of the physical sciences. Using careful descriptive procedures phenomenologists study a wide range of psychological phenomena such as: states of consciousness (normal and abnormal), the spectrum of imaginary experiences, meanings, values, relationships and emotions as well as our subtle awareness of time, space and reality itself. Students will be introduced to the epistemological approach, the specific methods, and the overall subject matter of the field of phenomenological psychology. Most importantly, students will learn phenomenology by doing phenomenology. Students will perform an original qualitative phenomenological research project and will elucidate a particular topic from within the phenomenological perspective. Specifically, students will be trained in descriptive interview techniques, phenomenological analysis of descriptions, bibliographical research methods, writing literature reviews, oral presentation skills, and (most importantly) critical theoretical analysis of descriptive qualitative data. Classes will alternate between l. theory sessions and 2. applied research sessions.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 440 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: EYEWITNESS MEMORY
Through the ages the testimony of apparently truthful and confident eyewitnesses have provided some of the most compelling evidence in courts of law, often leading to the conviction of the accused. Underlying this practice are certain assumptions regarding the nature and accuracy of memory as well as our personal intuitive access to it. For example it is assumed that we can correctly discern, by introspection, which memories are accurate and which are not and that our expression of confidence in our memories may be taken as a reliable indicator of accuracy, absent a motive to lie. Yet, for more than a century psychologists have cautioned that mistaken eyewitness identifications may be a greater cause of false accusation and punishment than common sense intuitions would have us believe. This would be especially so where the witness and the accused is the same individual, that is, in cases of false confession. In recent years, the legal system has begun to take serious notice and today the psychology of memory is at the center of development of legal thought and practice in the developed world. In this course we examine the history of speculation and research on memory, with special reference to eyewitness testimony, acceptance of expert testimony by courts, and contemporary research on eyewitness identification, child testimony, false confessions, interrogation techniques and jurors’ general beliefs about memory.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 450 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
In the first years of life, children's cognition undergoes dramatic qualitative and quantitative change. For nearly a century, experimental psychologists have sought to understand the nature and causes of these developmental changes. This course will examine how children's thinking develops from infancy through childhood. We will discuss how children develop knowledge and reasoning skills across various domains (e.g., how children learn and think about objects, people, the natural world, memory, and society) and we will examine the major theories and explanations of cognitive growth. You will learn both classic and cutting edge paradigms for studying and understanding cognitive development. We will develop your critical analysis skills by considering the strengths and limitations of each theory and research strategy. You will also polish your oral and written communication skills. The course will involve lectures, active group discussions, and analysis of the course readings. Assignments will include writing response papers, presenting research articles, leading class discussions, and a significant research paper. Fulfills Category 8 Capstone Seminar requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course, Seminar

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 451 - CAPSTONE SEMINAR: BLACK PSYCHOLOGY
The realities of living in a pluralistic, multicultural society make the goal of understanding the historical, economic, political, and socio-psychological experiences of African-Americans a salient rather than ephemeral one. This course as part of a semester-long exploration will sensitively examine their collective experiences. Capstone Seminar: Black Psychology is an advanced seminar which explores in depth original articles from the Journal of Black Psychology and The Journal of Pan-African Studies presenting methodological and other critiques. Some of the selected topics include: the unethical biomedical Tuskegee Study, HIV/AIDS in the Black community, the social psychology of prejudice and racism, anti-poverty programs, the controversies surrounding intelligence testing and the psychometric movement, and the Black family. Students will be required to do individual oral presentations covering topics such as: mass incarceration, white rage, policing and the Black community, Black Lives Mailer, Black religiosity and spirituality, and LGBT issues. Active participation in group discussions in this capstone course is strongly encouraged and welcomed.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 472 - ADVANCED RESEARCH
This course will involve the completion of an independent empirical research project by each student enrolled. The research process will begin with a review of research methodology and analysis techniques, and an evaluation of the pros and cons of various approaches to reserarch. Students will then be required to select a topic for their projects that relates to one of the instructor's areas of expertise, complete a literature review, design an appropriate emipirical project, write a research proposal to an Institutional Review board (IRB), complete all data collection, analyze all data, and write a final research report using APA writing standards. In addition, students will give publc presentations on their research findings at the end of the course. This course fulfills the Catagory 7 requirement of the psychology major. (Formerly Category 6)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PSYC 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department

PSYC 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Psychology Department


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