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Fall 2019
Nov 30,2020
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

PHIL 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PHILOSOPHY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Philosophy Department

PHIL 106 - INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC
This course is designed to introduce students to the language, methodology, scope, and spirit of both informal and formal logic. These two topics are rich in applications, for college success and well beyond. The study of these two topics will [i] provide students with an introduction to key ideas in the field of informal and formal logic, (ii) provide students with a way to measure the quality and quantity of argument [m] develop statistical thinking and critical thinking skills, and (iv) expand the appreciation of mathematical reasoning through formal logic. This course will pay special attention to the deductive method and: the use of variables; sentential calculus; and theories of identity, classes, and relations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Quantitative Rsng

PHIL 143 - LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY
The course proposes to introduce and discuss various accounts of love and friendship offered by philosophers from Antiquity to the present, focusing on the Greco-Roman and Abrahamic traditions. Thus, besides, hopefully, gaining some insight into what it is we are talking about when we use the words 'love' and 'friendship,' the seminar will also be a "friendly" introduction to the history of philosophy.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve

PHIL 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PHILOSOPHY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Philosophy Department

PHIL 201 - WORLD WISDOM TRADITIONS
This course will introduce you to Philosophy's "World Wisdom Traditions." Philosophers are supposed to be "lovers ofwisdom." They sometimes make arguments on what is real, or what is just, or what is true. In this class, we will all become philosophers. And as philosophers, some questions we will ask ourselves are: What is an argument, and why make one? Does God exist? Do we exist? How should we treat ourselves or other people? Special attention will be paid to how Eastern and Western philosophy and religion intersect in four great wisdom traditions: the Abrahamic, Greco—Roman, Indian, and Chinese traditions.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, WRITING INTENSIVE

PHIL 205 - THE ETHICAL SELF
This course discusses some of life’s basic questions. How do we construct our ‘self? “What has the greatest influence on our ‘selfgour past, present or future‘? How can we act as an Ethical Self? ln this course. ‘self’ is understood as complex, constituted through the dialectic among processes at societal, local and ‘personal’ (i.e., agentive) levels. The self, so created, is deeply influenced by societal discourses (e.g., gender, race, class), and can be seen as hybrid and filled with tensions. For example, a woman may be career oriented, yet also deeply committed to motherhood. These two aspects of her ‘self’ sometimes pull her in opposing directions, causing tension and ambiguity. Our goal in this course is to conceptualize the Ethical Self: One who understands the ‘self as cohesive despite the presence of tension. So too, the Ethical Self approaches ambiguity with tolerance rather than intolerance. We will pay special attention to one’s economic status in this course, and the affect that inequity of resources can have on identity construction.We will read about scholars such as Charles Pierce, Hans Vaihinger, Maria Lugones, Gloria Anzaldua, James Fowler and Lawrence Kohlberg. As you work through these readings, you will be guided by a series of keystone questions, such as those above, that will help you to engage more deeply with the readings. This is cross listed as PSYC205 -- The Ethical Self.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Values and Ethics

PHIL 210 - EXISTENTIALISM
Existentialism is a philosophical movement that began in the 19th century. Existentialists pay special attention to the individual person's reality. Questions existentialists often ask are: What is the meaning of life? Why bother doing anything if this meaning cannot be determined? If God does not exist, what consequence does that carry for my own life? What moral, political, or aesthetic choices should I make, given the overwhelming freedom I have? In this class, we will explore such questions in philosophical essays as well as in literature.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

PHIL 222 - JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY, AND ISLAM
The focus of this course will be the Middle Ages, the period spanning roughly between the 5th and 14th centuries. It was a time when the three so-called Abrahamic religions entertained an on-going philosophical discourse. The discourse included the justification of evil, the predominance of faith or reason, and the nature of God. Readings will be from original sources.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

PHIL 226 - CRITICAL THINKING
This course is an introduction to ways to critically evaluate arguments. Arguments occupy a large part of our discourse, be it personal or professional. Arguments consist of linguistic entities that have properties (they are true or false, for example); we shall explore the various forms of these entities. Arguments themselves have properties that we shall try to understand. We shall look at common fallacies and finish the semester by trying to figure out ways to determine the causes of events.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 230 - ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
This course is an overview of Greek and Roman Philosophy. Readings will include selections from the Hellenic, Hellenistic and Roman periods. The Hellenic period reflects the importance of the city-state; readings include fragments from the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. The Hellenistic age spans the Alexandrian period. The empire replaces the city-state and individual schools of Philosophy appear to fill the void left by the departure of the city-state. The Stoic, the Skeptic, the Epicurean and the Cynics are the principal schools of that period. Finally, we shall explore the eclecticism of Roman Philosophy.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 233 - ETHICS
(Formerly PHIL333) This course is an introduction to ethics. Ethics asks how humans ought to live and the kinds of people they ought to try to be. We will discuss whether we can arrive at final answers to such questions. This class will have a dual focus on both theories of ethics, as Well as on applied problems in today's multicultural world: world poverty. war. race and sexuality, among other topics. Our philosophical readings will include classic texts (e.g., Plato. Kant. and Mill) as well as recent texts (e.g.. Martin Luther King. Carol Gilligan. and Peter Singer). We will learn through conversation. working and teaching in groups. and writing papers and exams.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Values and Ethics, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

PHIL 235 - ASIAN PHILOSOPHY
This is a survey course that will offer students an introductory understanding of the main schools of philosophical thought indigenous to South and East Asia.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

PHIL 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo college course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PHILOSOPHY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Philosophy Department

PHIL 302 - WORLD RELIGIONS
The emphasis will be on "living" religions, i.e. those that are still practiced today. They include: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism and Bahai. The readings will consist of textbook narratives as well as excerpts from the Scriptures that form the basis of the religions. We shall pay particular attention to the advice religions give their adherents as to how to live a good life.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 304 - SELF GROWTH
Knowing oneself is the basis of knowledge, as the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates taught. This class explores theories, narratives, and techniques of self-growth. This is a “hands on,” practical-learning course, based on the proposition that each of us processes the capacity of attaining a life of fulfillment. In addition to traditional methods of learning, this class will also attend to mindfulness in the Buddhist tradition of Zen. In short, this class will prepare you to be a better reader, writer, researcher, and thinker who is able to effectively engage with, and listen to, philosophical texts, fellow students, the professor, and oneself. As part of the process of furthering your growth, you will likely clarify or develop your own philosophy of life.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

PHIL 310 - REALITY AND KNOWLEDGE
This course will examine the study reality (metaphysics) and the study of knowledge (epistemology). The readings will consist ofclassic and contemporary contributions on the topics, including the nature of the physical world, causation, minds, properties, truth, persons, God, free will, fate, evidence, belief, observation, innateness, reason, doubt, and fallibility. Some questions we will consider are: What is the difference between knowledge, belief, and evidence? Which methods should we use to know anything at all? What is more real, the world of material things or the world of ideas? What is the relationship of mind to body? This class is writing intensive (WI).
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

PHIL 321 - PHILOSOPHY OF ART AND BEAUTY
This course will be a comprehensive survey of aesthetics, the philosophy of art and beauty. Art (for example, visual art, music, literature, or architecture) and natural beauty reprominent themes in aesthetics. This course will survey different topics in aesthetics, and we will all become philosophers. Some questions we will ask ourselves are: What is art? ls art necessarily beautiful? ls beauty objective or subjective’? What does it mean to have an aesthetic experience? We will read ancient, modern, and contemporary works from European, American, and Chinese philosophy. We will learn through conversation, working and learning in groups, and writing papers and exams.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Culture & Creativity, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 322 - PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Philosophy of Science is a fairly new discipline. It grew around the end of the 19th century after many scientific discoveries challenged some of our basic assumptions. We shall focus on the so-called modern scientific method and criticisms of it. Readings will include philosophers from the Continental traditions, e.g., Cassirer, Bachelard and Foucault, as well as philosophers from the Analytic traditions. The course will also include multi-cultural and feminist approaches to the Philosophy of Science.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

PHIL 325 - SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY
This course provides a critical introduction to the painting, sculpture, photography, and popular visual culture of the U.S. from 1865-1945, a period of unprecedented modernization and change. We'll begin with the generation of American artists active during and immediately after the Civil War in the late 1860s, and end with the transfusion of American artistic trends into industrial design and consumer culture of the late 1930s. Central to this course's investigation of American art will be the study of the impact of the following historical phenomena--immigration (both internal and external), WWI, industrialization, urbanization, economic crises, and radical politics--on American art, and also how American art contributed to the production of specific racial, classed, and gendered American subjects.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

PHIL 328 - BIOETHICS
This course will be a comprehensive introduction to bioethics. Bioethics applies the traditional ethical concerns to the technologies and choices of today's world. Some questions we will consider are: When does human life begin? What does it mean to create life? How are humans uniquely responsible for sustaining life? Should it ever be ended for compassionate reasons? What obligations do we have to those who cannot make their own health care decisions? We will learn through conversation, working and teaching in groups and writing papers and exams.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Syst, Sust&Society, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

PHIL 330 - AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
"American Philosophy" examines the works of major American Philosophers beginning with Jonathan Edwards and ending with Cornel West. After reading two essays by R.W. Emerson, we shall focus on the works of the so called "pragmatist" philosophers of the 19th century, C.S. Peirce, William James, Jane Addams and John Dewey. We shall read and discuss signature essays such as "The Fixation of a Belief" and "The Will to Believe." Philosophical issues will include theories of knowledge and of meaning, education and freedom.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value

PHIL 337 - PLATO AND ARISTOTLE
Essentially, the course has three goals. It attempts to separate the thought of Socrates from that of Plato. For this goal, readings include the following dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Symposium and Phaedrus. Students are also encouraged to read Xenophon and Aristophanes. The second goal is to understand the thought of Plato on knowledge, ethics, politics and art. The Republic will be the main source of our information. Finally, Aristotle's criticisms of Plato's thought will occupy the rest of the semester.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 345 - WORLD PHILOSOPHY
Four areas of the world will be the focus of this course: China, India, Russia and Africa. We shall explore the thoughts of ancient and medieval China as well as those of India. For Russia we shall concentrate on the 19th and 20th centuries, and for Africa our focus will be the identity of an African Philosophy, a debate that has occupied much of the past 30 years. Time permitting, we may read and discuss some fairly recent thoughts from Islamic countries.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

Philosophy Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PHIL 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: PHILOSOPHY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Philosophy Department

PHIL 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department

PHIL 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Philosophy Department


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