Go to Main Content

Ramapo College Information System

 

HELP | EXIT

Catalog Entries

 

Fall 2019
Nov 30,2020
Transparent Image
Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

HIST 100 - IS-HISTORY

0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

History Department

HIST 101 - EARLY AMERICA TO 1865
History 101 is a survey of American history beginning with the prehistoric settlement of the Americas by Native Americans, the founding of the first European settlements in North America, and the emergence of the United States of America up to the end of the American Civil War. Our aim will be to look at important changes in the broad scope the nation’s history during these years, while at the same time focusing on what these changes meant in the daily lives of Americans.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve, GE-HISTORY

HIST 102 - MODERN AMERICA SINCE 1865
This course covers American history from 1865 to the present. We examine the major events that impacted domestic society and enabled America to assume global power. We cover a variety of topics, including immigration, work, social reform, war, peace, electoral politics, mass culture, economic crisis and bundance, various civil rights movements, family life, and sexuality. As we explore each topic, we focus on how people, ideas, and popular movements have interacted with the state along gender, race/ethnic, and class lines. Lectures, discussions, course assignments, and primary and secondary source readings will help you to develop a framework for thinking like a historian. You will become a better researcher and writer who can analyze sources more effectively, form well-supported arguments, and think historically about yourselves and the world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve, GE-HISTORY

HIST 105 - WESTERN STUDIES I
An introduction to European culture from antiquity to the Renaissance. The course will coordinate the subject matter and methods of three disciplinary approaches: history of ideas, history of politics and culture, and history of art. It will give students a grasp of major cultural states, with emphasis on Greek culture and thought, the Roman Empire, the merging of Judaic and Hellenistic thought and the rise of Christianity, medieval Christendom, Renaissance humanism, and the Reformation.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-HISTORY

HIST 106 - WESTERN STUDIES II
An introduction to the modernization and development of Western culture from the Renaissance to the 20th century. The course will study these areas through an analysis of social, economic, and political change as the background for cultural and intellectual developments. Emphasis will be given to the scientific revolution, classical rationalism, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, and major modern trends of thought, such as Marxism, Darwinism, and Existentialism.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-HISTORY

HIST 109 - EARLY WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
From the "stones and bones" of the earliest human records to the European encounter with native America, this course examines the development of pre-modern humanity.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve, GE-HISTORY

HIST 110 - MODERN WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
From the European discovery and conquest of the New World to the present, this course examines the development of modern human civilizations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Historical Prspctve, GE-HISTORY

HIST 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: HISTORY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 201 - HISTORIOGRAPHY
This is a requirement for all History majors. Historiography is the study of how history is "made." Students will learn and practice valuable skills such as evaluating primary and secondary sources, tracing the historiographic development of a topic, understanding different "schools" of historical writing, and writing good history, themselves.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 208 - SOCIALISM AND COMMUNISM
This course traces the history ofSocialism and Communism, as intellectual movements in the early 19th century, to major political forces in the late 19th century. It explores the creation of Socialist and Communist parties, their influence on European and American politics, and their role in the major events of the 19-20th centuries. lt will study the creation ofCommunist states, differentiating between those that collapsed and those that evolved away from their original ideals. It will examine the development of democratic Socialism in modern European democracies. Finally, it will explore the meaning ofSocialism in American politics today. This course is cross-listed with POLI-208.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

History Department

HIST 211 - COLONIAL NORTH AMERICA
An examination of the progressive transformation of the American colonies into the American nation. The course will stress the reasons for settlement; early sectional development; British imperial theory and policy; evolution of American political, religious, social, and economic ideas and institutions; the revolutionary crisis; the War for Independence; the Articles of Government; and the Constitution.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

HIST 212 - ERA OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
From the earliest days of the republic, Americans have debated the origins and significance of their revolutionary beginnings. This class will study the Revolution's meaning and aftermath by uncovering the perspectives of ordinary participants on the nation they created. Students will explore, through close readings of both primary and secondary sources, how and why men and women did, or did not, join the revolutionary struggle, and how revolutionary ideals were translated and transformed during the constitutional period. Topics covered include: the unraveling of Britain's North American empire; how fighting the Revolution challenged participants to rethink their positions on political participation, slavery, liberty, and race; the role of women in a republican society; the effects of social inequality, religion, and ideology on political mobilization; African American and Native American interpretations of the conflict, and post-war social unrest.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 213 - EARLY AMERICAN NATION
An analysis of the political, social, and cultural origins of American nationalism as it took shape in the period between the American Revolution and the election of Andrew Jackson.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 215 - CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
A study of the trauma created by the Civil War and the economic, political, and social revolution that re-made our nation. In an intense examination of the men and the issues, the course will analyze the evolution of change and reaction as the nation was purged of slavery and entered the new age of industrialization.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 217 - AMERICA IN THE GILDED AGE AND PROGRESSIVE ERA
An exploration of the age when America changed from an agrarian culture to an industrialized nation. The course will focus on the nation's reactions to new discoveries in science, technology, and the unsettling consequences of industrialization and urbanization. Fascinating personalities such as Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and William J. Bryan crowd the headlines of that day.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 218 - HIST OF BUSINESS & INDUSTRY
An analysis of the function of innovation and technology in the evolution of American business. Progressing from the early commercial ventures of Colonial times to the explosion of heavy industrialization and corporate concentration. The course will analyze the impact of industrialization and its attendant urbanization on U.S. life.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 219 - CHILDHOOD AND YOUTH IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICA
This course examines the development of a distinct youth culture in 20th century America. specifically, we will look at how psychological theories, educational practice, family transformation, economic changes, and the growth of a consumer culture combined to create new definitions and interpretations of childhood and youth in modern America. As texts, this course will utilize both historical works and cultural artifacts, such as films, magazines, and television programs, to explore how the social meaning of being young in the United States has changed.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 220 - 20TH CENTURY US SOCIAL HISTORY
Social history examines how ordinary people are affected by, adapt to, and influence the process of historical change. This course examines American society "from the bottom up." Although the larger processes of political and economic change that transformed America into an industrial world power in the 20th century will provide the necessary background, this course concentrates on how ordinary people dealt with these changes. Specifically, the changing nature of work, family, community, gender, and race relations provide the organizational themes for this course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 221 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY I
This course will focus on the history of African Americans from pre-colonial Africa to the institution of slavery in the West. The major focus of this course is to survey and analyze the historical and cultural connection between Africans in the Diaspora. Students will review the impact of colonialism, slavery, segregation, and individual and institutional racism as it relates and affects African people throughout the global world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course
All Sections for this Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-Africana Studies, MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., MJ-AMER- Amer History, MJ-AMER- African-Amer Studies, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

HIST 222 - AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY II
This course will focus on the history of African Americans from the Civil War to present day America. Students will review and assess the chronicle of suffering and cruelties experienced in slavery, segregation, and institutionalized racism, as well as examining the exploits of Black soldiers, slaves in revolt, and the martyrs and heroes of the Civil and Human Rights involvements.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-Africana Studies, MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., MJ-AMER- Amer History, MJ-AMER- African-Amer Studies, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

HIST 224 - WORLD WAR II: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
This course introduces students to the history of the second World War. Besides a brief introduction to the origins and effects of the war, this course will cover such topics as Fascist and Nazi movements; the grand strategies of the great powers: Great Britain, the Soviet Union, the United States, Germany, and Japan; the appeasement and the origins of the war; the resistance movements in Europe; China's role in the war; war-time international relations; and the founding of the Yalta System. The Holocaust and genocide, the slaughters in China, and the tragedy of atomic bombing in Japan will also be studied. Documentary films, videotape materials, and guest speakers will be included in the course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer in the World

HIST 225 - DECADE OF THE 1950'S
This course will be a multi-media study of America during the 1950s. We will use as our primary materials music (pop and the birth of rock), TV (Berle and Lucy), movies (Dean and Brando), Literature (Kerouac, Sloan Wilson, and Baldwin), art (Hopper and Pollock), history and other disciplines. The 1950s set the necessary scene for the social revolutions of the 1960s and we will examine the formative stages of that most vibrant period. The course will make extensive use of the Internet.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

HIST 226 - THE 1960s:AMERICA IN TRANSITION
The 1960s was a watershed decade in modern American history. The United States that emerged in its aftermath was very different from the country that existed before. The common image of the 1960s is filled with hippies, sex, drugs, music, and protest. But what really happened? This course examines the political, social, and cultural struggles that occurred in the U.S. from roughly the mid-1950s through the mid-1970s. Studying this pivotal time period deepens our understanding of postwar America and reveals the roots of many contemporary issues and conflicts. Major course themes include: the various civil rights movements and Black Power; the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement; the rise of both the New Left and the New Right; the environmental movement; the counterculture and cultural change; and the emergence of and backlash to feminism and gay and lesbian rights. We will seek to understand what these movements were and why they occurred at roughly the same time.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc.

HIST 230 - AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY
Intended as an introduction to the varieties of American religious experiences, this course will understand religion broadly as a lived cultural system that gave shape and meaning both to individual lives and to social and political events. The course covers the history of American religion from the colonial period to the end of the 20th century, focusing on the development of a pluralistic religious culture. Readings emphasize how ordinary people have understood and practiced their faiths, rather than the doctrinal and philosophical distinctions among religions.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 231 - US WOMENS AND GENDER HISTORY
The role played by women throughout American history is a significant one. This course will approach that role in two ways: 1) what were the women themselves doing -- from community-building to working against slavery or from suffrage to the modern movement -- for complete liberation; and 2) how were political, economic, social, and psychological mechanisms used by society both to obscure these contributions and prevent women from achieving equality with men.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality, MJ-AMER- Amer History, MJ-AMER-Gender Issues

HIST 232 - IMMIGRATION TO AMERICA
An examination of the major periods and patterns of immigration to the United States. Attention will be given to why the immigrants left, what they expected to find here, and how they affected American life and culture.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Race & Ethnicity, MJ-AMER- Amer History, MJ-AMER-Multicultural Studies

HIST 241 - ANCIENT GREECE
A study of the growth of Greek civilization and society from Homer to Alexander-the-Great. This course will explore the ancient Greek way of life through an examination of its literature and arts. Archaeological excavations in Greece and the near East will be investigated via reading materials to determine the indebtedness of Greek art, architecture, and philosophy to the cultures of the ancient Near East.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe, MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West

HIST 242 - ANCIENT ROME
A study of the political, economic, and constitutional history of Rome from the death of Caesar to the age of Constantine. The course will examine the changes in the Roman state during the first and second centuries A.D. as well as imperial expansion of Rome in Europe, Africa, Egypt, and the Near East. It will conclude with discussions of the reasons for the decline of the Roman empire and the origins of the Middle Ages.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe, MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West

HIST 251 - POLITICS OF EUROPE
This course will examine the development of political ideas, traditions, and parties in Europe in the past three centuries. lt will pay particular attention to the creation of the European Union and the development ofsupra-national identities. It will repeatedly emphasize the differences among European political systems and the differences between those systems and American political systems. Students should complete this semester with a solid understanding of the major political movements that emerged in Europe in the 18-20th centuries, as well as the current political landscape of Europe today.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 255 - 19TH CENTURY EUROPE
Topics in the study of a dynamic and formative era in England and the Continent. Among the course issues will be: the shift from rural to town life and work, the creation of "separate spheres for women and men," the reshaping of urban spaces, the scramble for empire, class conflict and accommodation, and the growth of feminism throughout most of Europe.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 257 - 20TH CENTURY EUROPE
This course examines the tumultuous twentieth century, in which much of Europe descended into dictatorship, waged two world wars, and ultimately destroyed most of the continent. The class will study European social, political, and economic developments. lt will examine Europe on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Finally, it will explore the "Velvet Revolution" that brought down Communism in Europe and promised a new era of unification that has only partially been realized.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 261 - ENGLISH HISTORY 1485-1800
An introduction to Tudor/Stuart Hanoverian England, emphasizing the personalities of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Charles I, Oliver Cromwell, and George III. The causes and consequences of the English Civil War, Glorious Revolution, American Revolution, and Industrial Revolution will be explored.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West

HIST 262 - BRITAIN FROM 1800 TO THE PRESENT
A survey course organized chronologically through a group of topics in the social and cultural history of Great Britain and, to some extent, of its empire, from industrialization to the present. We will be looking at the English in relation to the other peoples of the British Isles--Welsh, Scottish, Irish--and to its population of immigrants from abroad. Issues emphasized are: the creation of an "English" national identity, the significance of Ireland in British politics, the impact of the Empire in metropolitan Britain, and family and gender issues that have shaped modern Britain: protection of children, manliness, the genteel home, and women's rights, among them.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 263 - GERMAN HISTORY
This is a general survey of German history, from the earliest tribal origins of the "Germanic" peoples to the current Bundesrepublik within a unified Europe. The course will pay particular attention to the period 1789-1945, and to the development of German national identity.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 264 - JEWS IN 20TH CENTURY EUROPE
Just over 50 years ago, the history of the Jews in Europe almost ended. Nazi Germany in World War Two murdered more than 6 million Jews and countless others lost their families, their livelihoods and/or were displaced from their homes. Anti-Semitism, defined by Websler’s as hostility toward or discrimination against Jews as a religious or racial group, took on the dubious distinction ofbeing a paradigm for racial hatred throughout the world. The dark shadow of the Holocaust continues to hang over our civilization. And yet, the history of the Jews in Europe did not begin and end in Auschwitz. We need to know both how we got there and what happened afterward. Therefore, this course will delve into the profound social, political, and economic transformation of Jewish life in 20“ century Europe. Topics will include: the legacy of emancipation, the rise of modern anti-Semitism, the impact of modernization, the effects of political re-configuration, the rise of socialism, Zionism, destruction and renewal after l945. As part of the Global Awareness category of General Education at Ramapo College, this course enables students to explore diversity across a spectrum of differences, and seeks to understand how their actions affect both local and global communities. Students equipped with this understanding can address the world‘s most pressing and enduring issues collaboratively and equitably.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 265 - THE FIRST WORLD WAR
This course examines the years of the First World War and its immediate aftermath. Students will explore the causes of the war (and the many historical controversies about interpreting those causes), the course and manner of the fighting, the political and social consequences, and the oft-neglected aftermath conflicts. Finally, the course will address the ways in which the outcome of the war shaped the modern world, particularly the Middle East.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 270 - BEGINNINGS OF CIVILIZATION
A survey of the early civilizations ofAsia from the origin of urbanism at the end oi‘ the 4“‘millennium BCE to economic dislocations at the end of the 15' millennium BCE. During the course of the semester we will examine archaeological evidence, the Written record, the glyptic of cylinder and stamp seals, and the evidence derived from sculpture, art and material culture to reconstruct, engage, compare and contrast the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, Iran, India and China. The course will focus on cultural narrative with special concentration placed on religion, ritual. and myth. Social issues will be addressed through an examination of visual sources as well as ancient legal and economic texts. It will be argued that contrasting civilizations diverse in terms of religion, ethnicity and political organization, each attempt to solve the same template of enduring questions of cultural identity, spirituality, continuity, search for social order, and challenges of change and transformations. The theory that early societies, developed their theologies and rituals to directly contrast with those of neighboring peoples will be examined. It will be argued that this process reinforced ethnoccntric beliefs and resulted in ancient cultural biases which still prevail in the modern world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness

HIST 271 - ANCIENT EGYPT
An examination of ancient Egyptian history and thought. Covering the period from prehistoric times to the era of Roman conquests, the course will explore and analyze the Pyramids, Sphinx, and tombs of King Tut, plus many other examples of Egyptian funerary architecture.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MN-AFR AMER STD-Social Science, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Africa

HIST 272 - ANCIENT LAW
The development of slavery law and homicide law, and relationship between legal and religious institutions will be examined in Sumerian, Babylonian, Biblical, Greek, and Roman civilizations. Readings will include the Laws of Hammurabi, Reforms of Uruiningina, the Codes of Ur-Nammu and Lipit-Ishtar, "Exodus," Code of Gortyn, Aristotle's "Politics," selections from trial speeches of Demonsthenes and Cicero, and from Justinian's "Digest." Required for Law and Society program.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

HIST 273 - MEDIEVAL LAW AND SOCIETY
Constitutionalism, or the representative system of centralized government, is a major legacy of the Middle Ages. The course examines the evolution of this system of government through an analysis of the origins, development, and interaction of three distinct conceptual and practical bases of law in medieval society. These traditions include Germanic custom and feudal practices, canon law, and the 12th century revival of Roman law. Readings are drawn from original sources reflecting these traditions and include Tacitus' "Germania," selected documents from barbarian codes, selected feudal contracts, Gratian's "Decretum," Magna Carta, Bracton's "English Customs and Law," and Aquinas' "Treatise on Law." Required for Law and Society major.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe, MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

HIST 277 - INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS
This course serves as both a gateway course for students interested in pursuing upper level courses in East Asian studies, as well as a broadly conceived introduction to East Asian civilizations for students of different disciplines. This course will survey the social, intellectual, cultural, and political history of the major civilizations of Northeast and Southeast Asia from ancient times to the early modern era. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay between these civilizations, particularly the movement of people, ideas, and technology.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 278 - THE UNITED STATES AND EAST ASIA
The United States and East Asia have had profound influences in shaping each other's history over the past two centuries. From destabilizing the Tokugawa Shogunate and Christianizing Chosen Korea in the 19th century to contemplating a competitive Chinese superpower in the 21st century, this course will explore the cultural, political, economic, and strategic relations between the United States and China, Japan, and Korea as well as the Philippines and Vietnam.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer in the World, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 279 - JAPAN: EARLY CIVILIZATION TO MODERN REVOLUTION
From the emergence of a court-centered state 1500 years ago to a warrior-dominated society centuries later, Japan's early civilization has captivated a range of imaginations. The people, institutions, and ideas behind these visions of Japan will be the focus of the first half of the course. The second half of the course will focus on Japan's modern revolution, the invention and reinvention of Japanese identity, and how Japan has made its indelible mark on the world in which we live.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 282 - COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
This course will explore the history and culture of Latin America from the pre-Columbian period to the 19th century, focusing on Native American civilizations, European settlement, colonial development, slavery, independence movements, nationalism, economic forces, militarism, religious and ethnic identity, and other themes. We will also consider social, cultural, and economic interactions among indigenous peoples (especially Andean, Mayan, and Aztec), Spanish and Portuguese settlers, and Africans (also creoles). In our course we will consider how gender, class, race, language, art, literature, and other social and intercultural forces helped shape this enormous and extremely diverse region.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer Regionalism, Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Stds-Latin Amer

HIST 284 - LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION
This course is designed to introduce the student to Latin America. Organized as a history survey, it will also cover geography, literature, and anthropology.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Stds-Latin Amer

HIST 285 - HISTORY OF SOUTH AFRICA
An historical analysis of the peoples and cultures of Southern Africa. Beginning with an archaeological survey, the course will focus on a number of pre-20th century topics which explore issues that directly and indirectly set the scene for the turbulent 1900s: from the founding of the Union of South Africa to the struggles and ultimate triumph with the first-ever multi-racial elections of April 1994. The reading list includes works by Bishop Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela. Documentaries and slide shows will be shown and guest lecturers invited.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 286 - HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA
This course explores the social, economic, and political history of major ethnic groups in West Africa and West-Central Africa. Regional as well as cultural similarities and differences will be studied as an approach to beginning the process of learning how the peoples of Western Africa have addressed such issues as: the Atlantic slave trade, colonialism, the struggle for independence, and post-independence development.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies

HIST 287 - CONTEMPORARY AFRICA
Students will examine the social, political, cultural, and economic dimensions of contemporary African history. This course pays particular attention to the dynamics of African societies on the eve of European colonialism and the process of colonization in the late 19th century until World War I. Students will seek to understand why and how Europe colonized the continent and how colonialism transformed African societies. Students will also examine the rise of nationalism across the continent in the mid 20th century and the establishment of independent nations in the 1950s and 1960s. Students will examine the impact of African nationalism on independence struggles in Asia, Latin America and North America and the rise of the non-aligned movement. Finally the course will focus on the transformation of African societies in the post-colonial period, including increased civil war, economic decline and revival, intercontinental migrations, and a strengthening relationship with China.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 288 - WOMEN IN MIDDLE EASTERN SOCIETIES
The aim of this course is to promote an understanding of Muslim and non-Muslim women's experiences in the Middle East and Nonh Africa, as well as outside of the region. The course will examine Muslim women's past and present as involved agents in the creation and interpretation oflslamic culture, society, and religion, to dispel the stereotype that they have been the powerless victims in these developmental processes. To this end, alternative discourses will be explored, each focusing on the women and events that shaped them at different times in selected countries. We will look at how these discourses have changed with the advent of modernity, secularism, nationalism, trans-nationalism and globalization. We shall also examine the shifting rhetorical strategies women employ in their articulations of different forms of feminisms and lslamisms, interrogating how boundaries between the two are erected and dismantled.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Global Awareness

HIST 289 - ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE
An introduction to the history of Islamic visual culture. Key examples will be drawn from architecture, decorative art, textiles, and ceramics. Architectural works will be investigated with respect to their relationship to urbanization, social welfare, and patronage practices. Other fine arts such as miniature painting and calligraphy will be examined in their cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts. In both cases, collateral themes will include production methods and guild practices, pertinent conventions and usages, and cross-cultural influences relating to new contexts and forms.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
Gen Ed 2018, Gen Ed 18-Culture & Creativity, GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 290 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. HIST 290 THE 1960S: AMERICA IN TRANSITION. The 1960s was a watershed decade in modern American history. The United States that emerged in its aftermath was very different from the country that existed before. The common image of the sixties is filled with hippies, sex, drugs, music, and protest. But what really happened? This course examines the political, social, and cultural struggles that occurred in the U.S. from roughly the mid-1950s through the mid-1970s. Studying this pivotal time period deepens our understanding of postwar America and reveals the roots of many contemporary issues and conflicts. Major course themes include: the various civil rights movements and Black Power; the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement; the rise of both the New Left and the New Right; the environmental movement; the counterculture and cultural change; and the emergemce of and blacklash to feminism and gay and lesbian rights. We will seek to understand what these movements were and why they all occurred at roughly the same time.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 294 - WAR AND PEACEMAKING
(Formerly HIST394: "War, Peace & Conflict Resolution") -- This course examines the causes of war, including state and non-state actors. It examines the moral and ethical questions surrounding the decisions to engage in wars, and once engaged, the question of "rules" of conflict. lt also examines the ways in which wars are brought to a conclusion, such as various forms of diplomatic action and pressure, political and social change, and purely military solutions. It examines the issue of war crimes and war guilt, and the moral framework around cases ofreparation and post-war trials, Finally, it explores the theoretical basis of "peace" as something other than simply an absence of war.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

HIST 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: HISTORY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

History Department

HIST 302 - PUBLIC HISTORY
This course will examine the uses of history in the public sector -- in museums, communities, and institutions and includes historical sites, photography, and oral history. There will be a study of the evolution of public history in the United States, visits to places using public history and exercises in the practice of public history.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

HIST 305 - DISCOVERING DIGITAL HISTORY
Advances in computer technology have changed the way society interacts and how we interact with the past. While at its most basic, digital history involves using computer technology to study and present the past, it has far greater potential to change the way we study, the questions we ask, and the ways that we present our results to the public. This course provides an introduction to the field of digital history, and hands-on experience with digital tools to create public history projects accessible on the web. Students will explore primary sources materials, determine the best way to present them online, and create interpretive history sites using digital tools to present their findings to the public. Students will use course readings and discussions to learn about topics such as digital access, copyright, intellectual property, metadata, information abundance, and how the Web changes the relationship between historians and their audience. • This course includes a weekly practical lab and homework and will require the use of computers with access to the internet. • Some research off-campus may be required for class assignments.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Lecture/Online, Online Course

History Department

HIST 307 - MODERN CHINA AND THE WORLD
In Chinese, the name of the country means "Central Kingdom." In ancient times, the Chinese Empire was indeed the center of the world, rivaling all other civilizations in population, technology, and power. Despite a century of erosion suffered under modern imperialism, and struggling with enduring social, ethnic, and political divisions, China aspires to reclaim superpower status, and it appears to be succeeding. This course will explore the emergence of modern China as a key actor on the world. Particular attention will be paid to China's rich intellectual tradition, confrontation with imperialism, Cold War experience, and the antagonism that exists between democracy and dictatorship, between the vast diversity of the Chinese people and the homogenizing mission of the communist state.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 308 - KOREAN CINEMA & MODERN SOCIETY
Since the turn of the millennium, Asian observers have coined the term Hallyu ("Korean wave") to describe the extraordinary proliferation and penetration of Korean pop culture throughout Asian and other global markets. Through film and text sources, the course will explore how Korean films reflect both the general and particular contradictions in the modernization of Korean society in the last century. We will also explore how Korean romanticization of the past and projection of the future appeals to or alienates domestic and different foreign audiences.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 309 - THE KOREAN WAR AND THE INDOCHINA WARS
The Korean War and the First and Second Indochina Wars are some of the most significant events of the 20th century. This course will examine these wars as case studies for exploring the relationship between ideas and war. The belligerents, native peoples, and foreign powers that participated in each of these wars had conflicting assumptions, motivations, and paradigms that changed over time. Issues of post-colonialism, modernism, nationalism, Orientalism, industrialization, communism, and capitalism will be major themes of this course. In addition to standard secondary sources, students will be expected to work with primary sources, declassified government documents in particular, throughout the semester as well as in preparing the final research paper. As HIST201: Historiography is a prerequisite for this course, you will be expected to utilize the skills and analytical tools learned in that class, including an understanding of historiography, information literacy, proficiency in finding sources, ability to critically evaluate primary and secondary sources, and mastery of the Chicago Manual of Style humanities documentation standard.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 310 - MODERN KOREA AND THE WORLD
The aim of this course is to introduce Korean history to those students with little or no exposure to Korea and to challenge commonly held assumptions by those who do. The course will explore the cultural, political, and social impact of Korea's internationalization from early modern times to the contemporary period. The first part of the course will explore the turbulent interplay between Chosen Korea, dynastic overthrow in China, civil war in Japan, and the threat of Western imperialism. The second part of the course will focus on 20th century Korea--the colonial experience, division, war, and relations between the two Koreas, China, Japan, Russia, and the United States.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 311 - THE AMERICAN WEST
An examination of the myth and reality of American westward expansion and the frontier experience. Particular attention will be given to the impact of westward expansion on American Indian culture and to the relationship between the settlement of the West, U.S. government policy, and American capitalism.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer Regionalism, MJ-AMER-Amer. Regionalism, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 313 - EARLY AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY
This course examines the history of religion in what would become the United States, from pre-Columbian times to the first decades of independence from Great Britain. It focuses on European and North American Christianity, but also explores the religious traditions of Native Americans, people of African descent, and others. We will discuss the theological differences that kept religious communities separate from (and sometimes in conflict with) each other. We will also examine the many ways that Americans from different backgrounds came together to embrace common creeds. Throughout the course we will engage popular views of religion and spirituality, including such themes as witchcraft (and witch hunting), folk healing, and popular evangelical traditions. We will chart the ebb and flow of religious culture, from its high points during the First and Second Great Awakenings, to its low points at the beginning of the 18th century and during the American Revolution.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer Regionalism, MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value

HIST 314 - EMPIRES AND INDEPENDENCE IN THE AMERICAS
This is a course for history majors and non-major (juniors and seniors) who have taken other college-level history courses. It will explore the history of empires in the Americas from the Conquest period to the wars for independence, up to 1830. Students will examine the military, cultural, social, economic, and political policies that monarchs used to establish and govern empires. Students will also consider how different cultures in Africa, Europe, and the Americas made sense of each other in the Age of Empires. Students will then study early independence movements in the Americas, including the American War of Independence, the Haitian Revolution, and the Spanish Wars of Independence. Students will write a major research paper that demonstrates their understanding of the rise and fall of empires in the Atlantic World, and what independence (and dependence) meant to the American peoples.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 316 - GENDER,RACE& AMERICAN POLITICS
When the American political system was created, one's gender and race were the principal factors used to determine who was granted full citizenship rights. White men were allowed to vote without question and became the most priviledged and powerful citizens in the new nation. Yet, that arrangement was questioned from the start as marginalized groups -- including women of all races -- pushed for equal citizenship and voting rights. This course examines their struggle for political and legal equality by analyzing how both gender and race have impacted American politics and ideas about citizenship over time. We focus on women's participation, or lack thereof, in politics from colonial times through present day. Our goal is to explore how women's political engagement over time has highlighted cultural tensions related to race, motherhood, family life, sexuality, work, and the meaning of citizenship. The class concludes by discussing the historical 2008 presidential election -- in which former U.S. Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama battled for the Democratic nomination -- in order to connect the tensions that contest exposed to what we have studied over the semester. This is cross-listed with AMER-316.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Gender & Sexuality, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 320 - LONDON AS A GLOBAL CITY
The program will take place from June 20 to July 17, 2008. It will commence with an intensive one-week preparatory segment to be held at Ramapo College, curing which students will become familiar with evolving nature of London not only as Britain's capital, but also its status as the country's leading commercial, cultural and population center. They will also gain a basic understanding of research methods in history and the social sciences and begin to choose their topics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 322 - AMERICA BETWEEN THE WARS
An examination of the United States during the "Jazz Age" and the Depression with special emphasis on the ways in which the nation struggled to redefine its beliefs and values in light of the vast social and economic changes associated with modernization. Topics will explore the growth of the consumer culture and "Babbittry" in the '20s, the social and economic devastation of the Depression, and the reform programs of the New Deal.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 323 - AMERICA SINCE 1945
This course explores the social, political, and cultural developments in modern U.S. history, paying special attention to the relationship between major historical processes and the lives and experiences of ordinary people and political activists. Throughout the course, race, class, and gender will remain critical analytical touchstones as we explore major postwar developments.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 324 - AGE OF SEGREGATION
A turning point is a period, person, philosophy, or event around which the direction of a people is changed or cemented. The period between 1866 and 1917, the Age of Segregation, was such a time in the history of America. Not only did the country fully commit to the industrialization that would drive its rise to preeminence as a world leader but also it adopted a post-slavery social structure that became as central to the fabric of the country as industrialization. This course will reduce the period to its basic elements. It will then detail the growth of the struggle to define the meaning of black citizenship from the combination of three of those elements: the urge to industrialize, the remnants of a slave society, and the will of African Americans to be full citizens. Material will also place the period in historical context detailing how the Age of Segregation evolved from a chaotic past and how it influenced 20th Century America. Among the topics students will review are black's response to segregation, the ramification of segregation, the four freedoms of post-slavery blacks, black's political successes of the reconstruction period, and the Hayes compromise.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

HIST 325 - BLACK POWER YEARS
The history of a people is more than the description of their condition over a period of time. It is also the understanding of that history's "turning points": the periods, people, philosophies, and events around which the direction of a people is changed or cemented. The first "turning point" for African-Americans was the point at which they ceased being Africans and became members of the Black Diaspora. This period (the enslavement of Africa) fundamentally changed the history of African people and started the history of African-Americans. Between 1619, when the first blacks came to America, and 2001, African American history has seen many other "turning points". The material presented in this course will be selected and organized to illuminate one of these "turning points." The years between 1969-1979, the Black Power years, were among the most searing periods of the nation. The Vietnam War and student protests provided an important backdrop for the period. As important as these two elements were, they had to share the American stage with the aggressive demands of the African American community. Although correctly characterized by militancy, the period was much more than riots. It marked the growing political power of blacks in America's cities, and increasing cultural consciousness among black Americans, a thrust to control the resources of the black community, and an effort to physical resist what many saw as the oppressive force of local, often urban, police units around the country. The objectives of this course will be to understand the reasons for the militancy of the period, to discuss the key elements to the period, to project its impact on America, and to place these years in the context of African American history.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MJ-AMER-African-Amer Stds., MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

HIST 326 - 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
A consideration of the sources of America's foreign policy from the late 19th century to recent years. The course will deal with some of the nation's dramatic forays -- turn-of-the-century imperialism, world wars, cold war, Vietnam -- as well as in its less dramatic relationships with other nations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer in the World, MJ-AMER-America in the World, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

HIST 327 - THE COLD WAR
This course will explore the Cold War between the US and Russia from its origins in the mid 1940’s to its dramatic end in recent years. It will analyze how relations between these nations and their leaders affected perceptions of the other and consequent actions during the 45 years that the Cold War dominated American foreign policy. In the context of the Cold War, the Korean War and the First and Second Indochina Wars are some of the most significant events of the twentieth century. This course will examine these wars as case studies for exploring the relationship between ideas and war. The belligerents, native peoples, and foreign powers that participated in each of these wars had conflicting assumptions, motivations, and paradigms that changed over time. Issues of post-colonialism, modernism, nationalism, Orientalism, industrialization, communism, and capitalism will be major themes of this course. In addition to standard secondary sources, students will be expected to work with primary sources, declassified government documents in particular, throughout the semester as well as in preparing the final research paper.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer in the World, MJ-AMER-America in the World, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 328 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN POLITICS IN THE ERA OF TRUMP
This course offers a history of political liberalism and conservatism, as they both developed from the 19305 through the present clay and got tethered to the Democratic and Republican parties, respectively. The class ends tip with diametrically-opposed political parties on almost all issues, thus giving shape to the bitter partisanship of today’s politics in the era of Donald Trump. We will discuss how the New Deal augmented the size and scope of the federal government, shifted the boundaries of race, and created a powerful welfare state and labor movement, while, paradoxically, also catering to wealthy capitalists. We then watch liberalism shift rightward toward the center after World War ll with the onset of the Cold War—a move that made liberalism ripe for attack on both the left and the right of the political spectrum by the 1960s. In the final portion of the class, we trace how a rightward-leaning political culture came to replace the centrist Cold War liberalism of the immediate postwar decades. Studying these political developments on the left and right explains the severe partisanship of today, which gave rise to the Trump presidency and its critics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc.

HIST 329 - PARADIGMS OF GENOCIDE
Before the international legal scholar Raphael Lemkin in 1944 coined the actual word of genocide, the kinds of massacres, extra-judicial killings, disappearances, political rape and other forms of state-sponsored violence their eliminationist intent was readily apparent to anyone who cared to delve behind the headlines. Whether we look at the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, or the more contemporary horrors of Rwanda and Darfur, a similar dynamic is apparent. Bigotry and human rights violations precede genocide. The Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923 and the Holocaust stand as the quintessential instances of genocide in our time. A wealth of textual material, television programs, feature films, documentaries and workshops has familiarized increasing numbers of secondary school teachers with the subject matter of the Holocaust (Nazi Germany's war against the Jews, 1933-1945). The enormous growth of scholarship about the Holocaust has, in turn, led to the growth and dissemination of knowledge about the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923. Sufficient evidence has been amassed and a body of research has been conducted to permit conceptualization. This identification of commonalities concerning the key roles of nationalism, racism, technology, communication, transportation, socio-economic tension, war and the abrogation of human rights has made it possible to construct a paradigm of genocide in which the Holocaust and other similar tragedies are seen as the potential and worst-case end results of bigotry and the denial of human rights. By placing the emphasis on the examination and analysis of primary sources, it is hoped that they will be guided in their investigation of controversial or emotionally laden subjects by scholarship as opposed to polemics and platitudes.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 340 - BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY
A survey of the archaeology and history of ancient Israel from the wanderings of the Patriarchs to the Roman destruction of the temple of Jerusalem and exile of the Jewish people. Literary and political documents from ancient Canaan, Egypt, Babylon, and Assyria will be examined and compared to sections of the Bible to illuminate the meaning of the biblical narrative.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

HIST 342 - WITCHCRAFT IN HISTORY
A survey of major outbreaks of witchcraft in Europe and on the American continent from the late Middle Ages through the 17th century. After an interdisciplinary introduction to the questions of shamanism and possession, the course will analyze the religious doctrines from which Western theories of witchcraft were derived and the skeptical attitudes which ultimately destroyed them. The final unit is an attempt to use the course findings in analyzing more contemporary "witch-crazes."
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 352 - AGE OF NAPOLEON
In the space of a single lifetime, western civilization made deep, sometimes radical changes in almost every sphere: politics, religion, society, economics, music, fashion, foreign affairs, the arts, and the military. This course will begin with the French Revolution, and examine these changes in detail. We will pay particular attention to: (1) The new concept of being a "citizen" of a nation-state, as opposed to being the "subject" of a monarch; (2) The coming of the first real world wars, as conflict spills out across the globe dominated by Europe; (3) The ways that artists and musicians captured this time of upheaval and change, as in the works of Goya, David, Beethoven, and Schubert; (4) The literature and mythology that grew up ground the person of Napoleon Bonaparte, which gave us the Romantic Era in literature and the arts.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 355 - EUROPE BETWEEN THE WARS
This course is intended to given an in-depth view of Central and East Central Europe in the troubled years between the two World Wars. Students will explore the political, social, economic, and cultural issues which defined the period: the failure of democracy; mounting nationalism, economic collapse, the rise of Nazism and Fascism; anti-Semitism; the failure of collective security and avant-garde culture.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 356 - MODERNISM AND ITS DISCONTENTS
This course provides an opportunity for students to gain knowledge of the forces and processes that shaped the history and culture of Central Europe in the 20th Century. It focuses on the impact of modernization in its various guises and serves as a prerequisite for participation in the study abroad program, Cultural Reflections.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

HIST 357 - HITLER, HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE
A psycho historical investigation of the Holocaust and of Adolph Hitler and his movement which left much of Europe in flames and ashes in 1945. This course will explore Hitler's childhood and personality, trace his rise to power, and explain how and why he caused so much destruction before committing suicide. Jewish reactions to anti-Semitism and the Holocaust will be analyzed using psychological studies of psychic defense, survivor's guilt, obedience to authority, and group delusion/illusion. In addition, the general issues of genocide and homicidal/suicidal millennialism will be discussed. Students will write a lengthy (15+ page) research paper based upon primary and secondary sources.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 363 - RUSSIAN REVOLUTIONS
An intensive investigation of revolution and revolutionary traditions in Russia and areas under its control, concentrating on the Revolutions of 1917 and their consequences, and concluding with an examination of contemporary revolutionary ferment. The personalities, policies, and contributions of Gorbachev, Lenin, Peter I, Stalin, Trotsky, Witte, and other leaders will be explored.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 364 - 20TH CENTURY EASTERN EUROPE
This course will explore the historical causes of the breakdown of communist regimes in Eastern Europe, the current state of political revival in the region, as well as the prospects for democratic development in the foreseeable future. Topics will include the Hungarian Revolution, Prague Spring, Rise of Solidarity, and the treatment of ethnic and religious minorities.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 365 - CULTURAL REFLECTIONS: HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE IN MODERN CENTRAL EUROPE
Cultural Reflections is an opportunity for students to view Prague and the Czech Republic as a living museum on the relationship between history, culture, society and architecture. Lasting three weeks, the program will not only look at buildings as artifacts, but also as structures reflecting the history, culture, politics, religious life, social dynamics and economics of the epochs in which they were erected. In this context, edifices from castles and churches to dwellings and factories stand as both monuments to bygone eras and living reminders of how the present has been shaped by the past. Cultural Reflections will enable participants to study this development first-hand with leading faculty from the Czech Technical University. In addition to presenting lectures and seminars, they will escort students on walking tours and excursions to sites in Prague and the Czech Republic. The core faculty will be joined by specialists who will brief program participants on current political, cultural, social and economic issues facing the people of the Czech Republic in their transition to an open society, including privatization and human rights.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 369 - THE EUROPEAN UNION
The European Union is a fascinating and unprecedented experiment in international cooperation and integration. Europeans, who spent the first half of the 20th century killing each other in spectacular effusions of nationalism, have since 1945 worked steadily to become more peaceful, democratic, and integrated. This class will explore the history of the EU and the development of its institutions. We will study the EU as an evolving organism, as a "club" of independent states, and from the perspective of those who are trying to get in. Finally, the course will explore current and future issues that the EU is addressing, such as refugees, immigration, citizenship, human rights, relations with the United States, and many others.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

HIST 380 - THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE
The Ottoman Empire was one of the most expansive and influential civilizations in modern history. Not since the 8th century Umayyad conquest of Iberia was a Muslim power so close to establishing a world empire with a strong presence in Europe. While historians no longer talk about empires in terms of growth and decline, the 16th century inarguably represents a "Golden Age" of Ottoman intellectual activity, cultural flourish, and military strength. This course aims to impart a general understanding of the formation and evolution of the administrative, military, judiciary, social, and religious institutions of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in 1300 to roughly 1600. In this formative period, the Empire blended Islamic/Arab, Mongolian and Byzantine traditions to form a uniquely Ottoman culture that lingers to the present day in such diverse areas as the Balkans and Central Asia. Weekly lectures will introduce the key features of an Ottoman institution, followed by weekly class discussions of the relevant readings. Discussions will be initiated by designated student presenters, who will lead the class to expand upon the assigned readings.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 381 - ARABIC HISTORY
This is an advanced survey of Arabic history, from the pre-Islamic period to the present. The course will pay particular attention to the following eras/topics: The development of Islam, the Abbasid Caliphate, the Crusades, and the subjugation by the Turks, European colonialism in the Arab world, the conflict with Israel, Arab Nationalism, and the current state of religion and politics in Arab societies.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 384 - EAST AFRICAN HISTORY
An introduction to the complex political, economic, and social interactions between governments, cultures, individuals, and other forces in eastern Africa. Topics will include social changes and modernization peace and war, rich vs. poor nations, and the global environment and community. Documentary films and guest speakers will be included in the course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Africa

HIST 385 - THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA
(Study Abroad course) This course will take a particularly unique perspective. The history of a people is more than the description of their condition over a period of time. It is also the understanding of that history's "turning points": the periods, people, philosophies, and events around which the direction of a people is changed or cemented. The material presented in this course will be selected and organized to illuminate these "turning points" in South African history; i.e., The Coming of the Dutch, Early South African Resistance, Formation of the ANC, The Sharpeville Massacre, The Soweto Riots, World Sanctions, Ending Apartheid, Democracy and The Transition.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-Africana Studies, MN-Africana Studies, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Africa

HIST 388 - COOP/INTERSHIP HISTORY
An academic program in which students are placed in work positions relevant to their academic majors and career goals. The program integrates academic work on-campus with supervised off-campus work experience in both the public and private sectors. Students may take up to two Co-ops in their academic career at Ramapo College. Students must be at least a Sophomore and have a 2.0 or better average to be eligible. Transfer students must have completed at least 16 credits at Ramapo.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Co-Op

History Department

HIST 390 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. HIST 390: DISCOVERING DIGITAL HISTORY. Advances in computer technology have changed the way society interacts and how we interact with the past. While at its most basic, digital history involves using computer technology to study and present the past, it has far greater potential to change the way we study, the questions we ask, and the ways that we present our results to the public. This course provides an introduction to the field of digital history, and hands-on experience with digital tools to create public history projects accessible on the web. Students will explore primary sources materials, determine the best way to present them online, and create interpretive history sites using digital tools to present their findings to the public. Students will use course readings and discussions to learn about topics such as digital access, copyright, intellectual property, metadata, information abundance, and how the Web changes the relationship between historians and their audience. HIST 390 WOMEN AND AMERICAN POLITICS. The 2008 presidential race was a groundbreaking election that featured women prominently in both major political parties. Leading feminist author Gloria Steinem argued during that election that because of pervasive sexism, women are never front runners in political campaigns. This course explores Steinem's assertion by analyzing women's participation, or lack thereof, in American politics from colonial times through present day. Our goal is to assess how women's political engagement over time has highlighted cultural tensions related to motherhood, family life, sexuality, race, work, and the meaning of citizenship. We look at how several issue-based, feminist, and anti-feminist campaigns have impacted electoral politics. We end by discussing women's involvement in the historic 2008 presidential election--connecting the tensions it exposed to what we have studied over the semester and assessing what, if anything, that campaign portends for women's political future. HIST 390 GOOGLE, GUTENBERG, AND HISTORY. Technological change has an enormous impact on history and our lives today. A European information explosion began with Johannes Gutenberg's printing innovations--popularized by the Gutenberg Bible of 1455. In 1996 two graduate students started Google, whose mission is "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful." The first of these information explosions is credited with being an enabling factor in the Protestant Revolution, the Enlightenment, political revolutions, and democracy, while the second is unfolding before us, helping to transform our world. The historical impact of both of these inventions, and some in between, will be explored in this seminar. Students will write in-depth research papers on a related subject. HIST 390 RUSSIAN-AMERICAN RELATIONS. A survey of Russian-American relations in 20th and early 21st centuries. Among the topics studied are Russian-American cooperation during World War I, the US reaction to the Russian revolution, the joint activity against Nazi during World War II, America and Russian political leaders from Lenin to Gorbachev, political analyses of the Soviet-US competition during the Cold War. The course also examines the current trends of Russian-American cooperation and partnership in different fields as a struggle against international terrorism.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 392 - HISTORY OF SEXUALITY: 1800 TO PRESENT
Scholars in many disciplines have been asking new questions about the meaning of sexuality and of taken-for-granted categories like "gay" and "straight", even "male" and "female", masculine and feminine. This course will look at a series of issues in the history of sexuality, including: homosexual subcultures in the past; female same-sex love relationships; "passing" women; prostitution; the Victorian sexual "system"; sex and slavery in the U.S. and Caribbean; sex reformers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the Nazi suppression of homosexuality; the history of birth control use; changing courtship patterns; the gay and lesbian rights movements; the sexual revolution of the 1960s; AIDS and its meanings; and teen sex and motherhood today. Our aim is not only to survey the great variety of sexual patterns and behaviors in recent European and American history, but also to think more analytically about the issues and activities we associate with sexuality.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

HIST 393 - CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN HISTORY
The history and experience of childhood and youth are the primary foci of this course which will survey these subjects in European and American history, and the contemporary world. Students will research and write about their own family history and childhood. They will read about children and childhood in the west, the childhoods of some famous individuals, and the changes in childrearing through the ages. Changing attitudes and behaviors regarding infanticide, swaddling, child abandonment, child labor, obligations to elders, arranged marriage, and physical punishment will be explored.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

HIST 395 - PSYCHOHISTORY
This course explores the "why" of history, current events, and society. Though psychology has always been used to understand history, most historians have typically relied on general psychological notions. Here the methods of psychology are systematically applied to the study of attitudes, historical events, and personalities. The methodology of psychohistory is to probe childhood, creativity, emotion, family dynamics, group fantasy, psychic trauma, psychobiography, and the differences between conscious and unconscious intention. Specific areas of study will include the questions of how Americans elect a president, the psychobiography of presidential candidates and leaders, the psychology of 9/11, and the European appeasement of Hitler. The two Presidents Bush, the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, and Hitler and the politicians who appeased him will be case studies.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES

HIST 397 - MILITARY HISTORY: AN ADVANCED SURVEY
This course will examine the evolution of warfare from the development of the nation-state in the 18th century, to the wars of the present. It will familiarize students with the structures of militaries and their relationships to governments and societies. It will address the major technological changes in conflict, as well as the changes in warfighting that reflect changed attitudes toward war itself. The goal of the course is for students to understand how war is made, and why it is made that way.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Hybrid, Lecture, Online Course

History Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: HISTORY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

History Department

HIST 410 - HISTORY SEMINAR
The History Seminar serves as a "capstone course" for students completing the History major. The topics and descriptions of this course change each semester, according to the instructor. Students are provided with focused training in historical research and writing, culminating in the production of a major research paper. Critical analysis of primary sources will be emphasized, along with key interpretations and historiographic debates specific to the course topic.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

History Department

Course Attributes:
WRITING INTENSIVE

HIST 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department

HIST 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

History Department


Return to Previous New Search XML Extract
Transparent Image
Skip to top of page
Release: 8.7.2.4